DEER CREST DESIGN GUIDELINES

(REVISED December 15, 2016)

The guidelines listed here are the most current Deer Crest Design Guidelines and they can be revised by the HOA Board of Trustees at a public meeting anytime. It is the responsibility of the recipient to frequently review these guidelines and insure they are working with the most updated version. These guidelines are subject to Design Review Committee (DRC) interpretation and will also serve to provide data to the members of the DRC to administer these guidelines. The DRC also reserves the right in extenuating circumstances to modify any requirements cited in these guidelines with proper approvals.


Please familiarize youself with the Design Review Process.

For your convenience, here are links to the Preliminary Documents Checklist (phase 1), and the Construction Document Checklist (phase 2) which must be completed and then submitted to your assigned Design Review architect.
To see the Design Review guildlines in .pdf version click here.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1.0 INTRODUCTION
2.0 PURPOSE OF THE DESIGN GUIDELINES
2.1 Intent
2.2 Guideline Format
3.0 COMMUNITY LANDSCAPE CHARACTER
3.1 General Site Characteristics

3.1.1 Topography
3.1.2 Climate
3.1.3 Vegetation
3.1.4 Proposed Community Landscape Character
3.1.5 Community Landscape Zones
3.1.6 Cut and Fill Landscape Zone
3.1.7 Entry/Intersection Landscape Zone
3.1.8 Slope Enhancement Zone

3.2 Impervious Surfaces
3.3 Gates and Entrances
3.4 Fences, Walls Above Grade, and Retaining Walls

3.4.1 Concrete Guardrails

3.5 Signage

3.5.1 Sign Categories and Sizes

3.6 Lighting
3.7 Landscape Structures and Site Furnishings
3.8 Amenities
4.0 SINGLE FAMILY ESTATE LOTS
4.1 On-Lot Site Planning
4.1.1 Existing Land Forms
4.1.2 Existing Site Vegetation
4.1.3 On-Site Planning
4.1.4 View Corridors
4.1.5 Location of Construction and Limits of Disturbance
4.2 Grading
4.2.1 Erosion Control
4.2.2 Site Grading Requirements
4.2.3 Driveway Grading
4.2.4 Driveway Handrails
4.3 Drainage
4.4 Landscaping
4.4.1 Revegetation
4.4.2 New Plantings
4.4.3 Solar Orientation and Views
4.4.4 On-Lot Landscape Standards
4.4.4.1 Planting Standards
4.4.4.2 Installation Standards
4.4.4.3 Irrigation Standards
4.4.4.4 Maintenance Standards
4.5 Snow Management
4.6 Building Envelope and Controls
4.6.1 Building Envelope
4.6.2 Building Character and Scale
4.6.3 Building Bulk Criteria
4.6.4 Dwelling and Other Impervious Coverage of the Lot
4.6.5 Floor Area
4.6.6 Maximum Building Height
4.6.6.1 Special Lot Height Restrictions
4.6.7 Permitted Architectural "Projections"
4.6.8 Double Lot Purchases
4.6.9 Unique Design Requirement
4.7 Materials and Features
4.7.1 Garages and on-lot parking
4.7.2 Exterior Walls Surfaces
4.7.2.1 Lower Surfaces
4.7.2.2 Upper Surfaces
4.7.2.3 Wall _Openings_
4.7.2.4 Wall Appurtenances
4.7.2.5 Wall Facing Materials
4.7.3 Paving
4.7.4 Roofs
4.7.4.1 Roof Shape and Ridge Alignment
4.7.4.2 Roof Slope
4.7.4.3 Roof Surfacing Material
4.7.4.4 Roof Appurtenances
4.7.5 Gutters
4.7.6 Chimney & _Chimney Caps_
4.7.7 Skylights
4.7.8 Flashing and Sheet Metal
4.7.9 Vents
4.7.10 Antennae
4.7.11 Solar
4.7.12 Fire Sprinklers
4.7.13 Fences and Walls Above Grade
4.7.13.1 Fencing and Wall Height and Distance from Structures
4.7.13.2 Fencing and Wall Material
4.7.13.3 Fencing, Walls and Hedges in Setback Areas
4.7.14 Surface Drainage
4.7.15 Mailboxes
4.7.16 Gas and Electric Meters
4.7.17 Trash Containers
4.7.18 Mechanical Equipment
4.7.19 Appurtenant Structures
5.0 CONDOMINIUM
5.1 Site Development Guidelines
5.1.1 Impervious Surfaces
5.1.2 Gates and Entrances
5.1.3 Walls and Fences Above Grade and Retaining Walls
5.1.4 Signage
5.1.4.1 Sign Categories and Sizes
5.1.5 Lighting
5.1.6 Landscape Structures and Site Furnishings
5.1.7 Site Planning
5.1.8 Site Drainage
5.1.9 Limits of Disturbance
5.1.10 View Corridors
5.1.11 Site Grading Requirements
5.1.12 Erosion Control
5.1.13 Driveways
5.1.14 Landscaping
5.1.14.1 Design
5.1.14.2 Revegetation
5.1.14.3 New Plantings
5.1.15 Snow Management
5.2 Building Design Guidelines
5.2.1 Building Envelope
5.2.2 Building Character and Scale
5.2.3 Parking
5.2.4 Building Materials
5.2.5 Wall Openings
5.2.6 Wall Appurtenances
5.2.7 Roofs
5.2.8 Roof Shape and Ridge Alignment
5.2.9 Roof Slope
5.2.10 Roof Surfacing Material
5.2.11 Roof Appurtenances
5.2.12 Gutters
5.2.13 Chimneys and Chimney Caps
5.2.14 Flashing and Sheet Metal
5.2.15 Vents
5.2.16 Antennae
5.2.17 Fire Sprinklers
5.2.18 Gas and Electric Meters
5.2.19 Trash Containers
5.2.20 Mechanical Equipment
5.3 Design Approval Process
5.3.1 Approving Bodies
5.3.2 The Process
5.3.3 Fees, Deposits and Insurance
5.3.3.1 Design Review Fee
5.3.3.2 Construction Coordination Fee
5.3.3.3 Security Deposit
5.3.3.4 Completion Deposit
5.3.3.5 Excess Excavation Assessment Fee
5.3.3.6 Blasting Monitoring Fee
5.3.3.7 Insurance
5.3.3.8 Remodel Fees
5.3.3.9 Completion Date Requirement
5.4 Construction Rules
5.4.1 Final Inspection and Approval Upon Completion
6.0 COMMERCIAL PARCELS (updates pending)
7.0 Design Approval Process & Construction Administration
7.1 Approving Bodies
7.1.1 Design Review Committee
7.2 The Process
7.3 Fees, Deposits and Insurance
7.3.1 Fees and Deposits
7.3.1.1 Design Review Fees
7.3.1.2 Construction Coordination Fee
7.3.1.3 Security Deposits
7.3.1.4 Completion Deposit
7.3.1.5 Excessive Excavation Assessment an Other Additional Fees
7.3.1.6 Blasting Fees
7.3.1.7 Insurance
7.3.1.8 Remodel Fees
7.3.1.9 Completion Date Requirement
7.4 Construction Rules
7.5 Surveyor's Requirements During Construction
7.6 Final Inspection and Approval Upon Completion

APPENDICES

Appendix A – Native Trees & Shrubs
Appendix B – Fire Resistant Vegetation
Appendix C – Deer Crest Landscape Plants
Appendix D – Lot Coverage Tabulations
Appendix E – Graphic Descriptions
Appendix F – Special Height Restriction Designations
Appendix G – Blasting Policy Regulations
Appendix H – Definition of Terms
Appendix I – Wasatch County Process
Appendix J – Sales Signage Guidelines
Appendix K – Construction Signage Guidelines
Appendix L – Wasatch County LOD Change Approval Letter
Appendix M – Plat Maps 1-92
Appendix N – Plat Maps 93-125
Appendix O – Plat Maps 126-130
Appendix P – Plat Maps 131-145
Appendix Q – Plat Maps for Hidden Hollow
Appendix R – Plat Maps for “U” Lots

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1.0 INTRODUCTION

The development of Deer Crest as a community, as well as the development of or alteration of each homesite or commercial lot within Deer Crest is controlled and restricted by the Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions for Deer Crest (hereinafter "CC&Rs"), as well as by all applicable government codes and regulations among which are conditions embodied in the First Amended Density Determination of Wasatch County (recorded 8/8/96) and the Preliminary Conditions of Approval, Phase I Deer Crest Estates Lots (dated 6/16/97). Homesite and commercial lot owners in Deer Crest will enjoy use of its many facilities through their membership in the Deer Crest Master Association (DCMA). As members of the DCMA, each owner will share in the DCMA's responsibilities for the common elements described in the CC&Rs, private streets and gates, infrastructure facilities, and landscaping along roadways, open space and trails, and recreational amenities.


The intent of the CC&Rs is to achieve the character and quality of development that will distinguish Deer Crest as a premier residential and resort community. To further refine the requirements contained in the CC&Rs, these Design Guidelines ("Guidelines") have been established by the Design Review Committee (hereinafter "DRC"), whose chairman and members are appointed by the DCMA Board pursuant to the CC&Rs. These Guidelines are intended to supplement the CC&Rs in the submittal of lot or parcel development plans by providing to the respective lot or parcel owners and their consultants more information on which to base preparation of their submittal packages. These Guidelines will also serve to provide the members of the DRC data upon which to base the review and approval. In addition, the procedures for submittal and review are described in these Guidelines.


It should be noted that these Guidelines are in no way intended to supersede any applicable statutes, codes, ordinances or regulations of a controlling governmental jurisdiction and it is the sole responsibility of the individual owner to comply with governmental codes and regulations. Each of the CC&Rs, these Guidelines and/or applicable government codes and regulations may be more restrictive than the other. In general, the most restrictive regulation will govern. Any specific conflicts between the CC&Rs, these Guidelines and applicable governmental codes and regulations shall be brought to the immediate attention of the DRC. Wasatch County and/or Park City will not issue a building permit to the individual owners of home sites or commercial lots in Deer Crest without written evidence of approval by the DRC. A building permit from a governmental agency without the companion approval of the DRC does not confer upon the lot owner or his contractors and agents the right to commence construction.


Each owner of a lot or development parcel within Deer Crest should familiarize him or herself with the intent and requirements of the CC&Rs, these Guidelines and all applicable governmental codes and regulations. Owners must require their contractors, landscape architects, architects and engineers to implement all provisions applicable to the construction, maintenance and development of his lot or parcel. All improvement plans, including but not limited to site plans, building and utility plans, landscaping plans, lighting design and graphic and signage designs, must be submitted to the DRC for review and approval.

2.0 PURPOSE OF THE DESIGN GUIDELINES

2.1 Intent

Deer Crest is a gated residential resort community located on approximately 600 acres. Over 65% of the land will be preserved as permanent open space. Five neighborhoods are nestled in the dramatic mountain terrain comprised of 146 estate lots, 379 condominium units, affordable housing units and up to 92,000 square feet of commercial space. The mountain climate, immediate access to Deer Valley and Park City, and an abundance of winter/summer recreational choices, including the water activities of the Jordanelle Reservoir favor the Deer Crest property.


Deer Crest features 24-hour gate guards in attendance, private streets, 50 skiable acres of trails within the community integrated with Deer Valley Resort trails and served by two ski lifts on the property, and five miles of world-class bike trails. The Deer Crest improvements and amenities will allow each property owner to experience the maximum possible enjoyment from their homesite and the Deer Crest community.


The following design guidelines are created to ensure, protect, and maintain the aesthetic quality and integrity of Deer Crest. The objective is to allow for flexibility of creative design and expression by property owners while maintaining harmony between the individual homes, the community and the natural beauty of the land. In this way, Deer Crest hopes to protect and enhance the investment of each homesite owner.


2.2 Guideline Format

These guidelines are intended to be used in the development of both large parcels and individual lots. They are organized first to discuss issues relative to site design followed by a section addressing issues relative to architectural design. The Deer Crest neighborhoods encompass a full range of uses from single family estate lots and multi-family parcels to recreational, commercial and hotel uses. Consequently, when issues affect only one type of use, a separate chapter has been prepared to address those issues. In these neighborhood specific chapters, both site and architectural design requirements may be discussed. Finally, a chapter has been designated to discuss the approval process itself and the steps and entities involved in obtaining design approval.


In the case of site design, the general issues addressed include overall landscape character, land forms, existing site vegetation, views, location of construction, grading, drainage, landscaping, impervious surfaces (paths, driveways, parking, plazas), gates and entrances, fences and retaining walls, signage, lighting, decks and patios, and amenities (such as pools and ski trails).


In the case of architectural design, the general issues include building character and style, scale and massing, materials, exterior spaces near buildings, roofs, and wall surfaces.


Specific neighborhood discussions will involve:
  • Single Family Estate Lots
  • Deer Crest Estates Neighborhood
  • Snowtop Neighborhood
  • Deer Hollow (single family)
  • Condominium Parcels Deer Hollow (condominiums)
  • Roosevelt Gap
  • Snow Park
  • Mixed Use/Commercial
  • Jordanelle Village

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3.0 COMMUNITY LANDSCAPE CHARACTER

3.1 General Site Characteristics

The Deer Crest project lies in Utah's Wasatch Mountains east of Deer Valley Resort. Most of the project is situated in Wasatch County with a portion within Park City, in Summit County. The site is primarily characterized by steep rolling terrain with long deep canyons. Due to the elevation and solar intensity, a limited variety of vegetation typical to high mountain climates exist in this area. The most striking vegetative types are the spruce and fir trees intermingled with stands of aspen and maple. Views from most of the single family lots extend to distant vistas, in particular those eastward to the Jordanelle Reservoir and south toward Bald Mountain. These vistas add to the excitement and beauty of the site. The mountainous character of the Deer Crest environment is among its most important attributes and makes it particularly attractive for residential development. Consequently, development must be carefully planned and implemented to mitigate slope impacts and restore disturbed areas.


3.1.1 Topography

The Deer Crest project consists of approximately 600 acres of land along the eastern ridge of Deer Valley's Snow Park area. Elevations on the site range from approximately 6,560 feet on the easterly portions of the site to the 7,950 foot peak of Little Baldy at the southwest end. Percentages of slope vary greatly over the site with flatter, more gently rolling terrain on the east, southeast slope. The terrain on the north, northeast portion of the project is much steeper and more undulating. The property offers unobstructed views of the picturesque Jordanelle Reservoir, the vast Uinta Range and Deer Valley's groomed trails and glades.


3.1.2 Climate

The project area experiences the snow quantities and temperatures associated with a high Rocky Mountain environment. Snow quantities average 300 inches annually and temperatures fall below 0 Fahrenheit approximately 20 days during the winter months. Snow disappears in late May and temperatures throughout the summer and fall are ideal, ranging from a low of 70 F to a high of 85 F on average. Rainfall averages 15 to 20 inches annually with most precipitation occurring in the spring. Winds during the year are generally out of the south/southwest and variable in velocity.


3.1.3 Vegetation

The Deer Crest property, due to its variety of aspect, terrain and dry weather conditions, enjoys a limited number of vegetative communities. These include:

The site is well-suited for establishing additional plantings and to revegetate disturbed areas when irrigated. The plant communities supply food and cover for a variety of wildlife. The proposed plan provides for preserving large areas of the site as open space (65% of the total acreage) to ensure preservation of the high mountain character of the environment and to protect wildlife habitat. Any disturbance occurring due to construction will be mitigated by revegetation with plant material indigenous to the site.


3.1.4 Proposed Community Landscape Character

The landscape character of Deer Crest will be governed by a unique and comprehensive landscape plan utilizing the natural landscape features, native fir and spruce, native stands of deciduous trees (quaking aspens, maple and oak) and natural grasses, shrubs and wildflowers, enhanced with ornamental plantings close to structures, along some roadway areas and at entries and intersections. Attention will be paid to the fire resistance of recommended plant materials. Additionally, landscaping will incorporate a variety of native evergreen and deciduous trees, shrubs and ground covers. Native perennials, hardy in mountainous climates, will be massed at intervals along the internal roadways, at the entrances to Deer Crest, and at select locations on the individual lots. Large trees and shrubs will be planted along the streets and at the entrances to Deer Crest. This landscaping will provide a unifying theme and a backdrop for the architecture and landscaping which will constitute each home.


3.1.5 Community Landscape Zones

There will be three primary landscaping efforts involved in the Deer Crest Community. These landscaping efforts relate to three Community Landscape Zones:

  1. "Cut and Fill Landscape Zone" - Reseeding of cut and fill slopes and other disturbed slope areas with natural grass, shrubs and wildflowers in order to stabilize slopes, provide an aesthetic appearance and blend into undisturbed areas
  2. "Entry/Intersection Landscape Zone" - Planting enhancements at all Deer Crest entries and at major internal intersections; landscaping to include trees, shrubs, flowers, and lawn along with gate walls, gates, gatehouses, landscape elements (benches, fountains, planters), fencing, signage and lighting
  3. "Road Enhancement Zone" - Planting enhancements along roadways in locations such as retaining walls to soften and augment the natural landscape

These landscape zones will be created and maintained by the DCMA and may include road cut and fill slopes on individual lots, the private roadways with cul-de-sacs and street intersection accents as well as major roadways, entrances and the open slopes. Project maintenance guidelines, including landscape maintenance guidelines, will be established from time to time by the DCMA Board.


3.1.6 Cut and Fill Landscape Zone

The cut and fill slopes throughout the Deer Crest project will be reseeded and planted with native plant materials as detailed in Appendix A and fire resistant plant materials as detailed in Appendix B. The purpose of this landscaping effort is to stabilize the slopes and return disturbed areas to the natural state.


3.1.7 Entry/Intersection Landscape Zone

The DCMA will maintain the gatehouse, maintenance shop, landscaping, entry walls (monumentation), fencing, hardscape, signage and lighting and the vehicular gates. There are two main gate areas and one secondary gate area within the Deer Crest Development. The main gate at Deer Crest Road and McKinley Gap (hereinafter the "Queen Esther Gate House"), the lower west gate at Deer Crest Road and Queen Esther Drive (hereinafter the "Queen Esther Gate") and the main east gate on Deer Hollow Road approaching from Highway 40 (hereinafter the "Jordanelle Gate") will be maintained by the DCMA. The Queen Esther Gate may not be used for construction traffic.


3.1.8 Slope Enhancement Zone

Slope enhancement areas will be planted with a variety of vegetation, which is outlined in the recommended planting list included as Appendix C. The roadway landscaping may be planted by the DCMA and will be maintained by the DCMA. The slopes located adjacent to interior streets may be buttressed by approved retaining walls. Alteration or modification of the slope area retaining walls, slope landscaping or landscaping in the planting enhancement zones is not permitted without written authorization of the DRC.


A roadway landscaping easement may exist within all lots as described on the plat of the lot. The roadway landscaping easement is planted by the DCMA and will be maintained by the DCMA. It is required that homeowners work with the natural landscaping vegetation patterns of Deer Crest in the design of their lots, auto courts and driveways. In the event that alterations of the natural landscaping patterns planted by the DCMA are unavoidable, movement and replacement of vegetation in these areas will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis by the DRC. In an alteration, the DCMA will insure restoration of the irrigation system and the landscape to its original condition at the lot owner's expense.


It is the responsibility of the lot owner to repair and replace damage caused by their construction. Damaged plant material within the slope enhancement zone must be replaced with matched species, i.e. size and specimen, while damaged irrigation must be replaced with matched type and quality. If vegetation is disrupted outside the building envelope due to construction, the vegetation can be replaced through an updated, approved landscape plan.


Road curb must be replaced if damaged during construction with the same concrete mix.


The DCMA may, at its sole option, repair all damage caused by any construction of any lot owner and will subtract the replacement costs from the owner's clean-up deposit. If construction damage costs exceed the cleanup deposit, then the DCMA will require that the deposit be replenished before construction of the home may continue.


The DCMA will not be responsible for the cost of snow removal or damage to landscaping caused by normal snowmaking operations on ski trails.


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3.2 Impervious Surfaces

All paved surfaces in Deer Crest should be of a scale and character suitable to the surrounding environment, responding to climate, terrain, and the palette of natural materials and colors existing on the site. Aesthetic and functional considerations should be employed in the choice of materials for paved areas.


Any plaza areas that are developed in conjunction with commercial or hotel facilities should be linked to adjacent open spaces and land uses to allow pedestrian access. Paving materials for the pedestrian plazas and walkways will be selected during the detailed architectural design process.


Except for the common roads and driveways of Deer Crest which may be asphalt, acceptable paving materials for any paved surfaces in Deer Crest include:

Unacceptable paving materials include:

It is very important that materials designated for use in plaza areas and major pedestrian walks be selected with regard to durability, maintenance, stability, and aesthetic appearance. It is also important that the selected paving material be applied consistently and uniformly to all pedestrian areas to enhance the overall design theme and continuity of Deer Crest and avoid a piecemeal approach which would result in a multiplicity of materials, surfaces and wear quality. Stairways and transitions throughout the outdoor spaces at Deer Crest should employ a uniform tread width and riser height wherever possible. It should be the responsibility of the architect and the property owner to become familiar with the design standards for the major common areas on the plazas and conform to them. Pedestrian walkways and access should be accommodated as a part of the planning and development of all properties.


3.3 Gates and Entrances

When designed properly, gateways and entrances contribute a great deal to establishing the character and theme of a development.


Driveways for individual projects or home sites may include private entrance gates and landscaping in keeping with the natural environment. The following guidelines are suggested for the construction of entrance gates:

  1. Gates may not exceed 6 feet in height and 12 feet in length on each side to road centerline or 24 feet wide maximum.
  2. Gate operator mechanisms shall conform to Fire Department regulations.
  3. Gates shall be set back 25 feet from property lines unless approved otherwise by the DRC.
  4. Materials required include native stone, wood, or concrete for supports and iron or wood for gates.
  5. Minimal diffused lighting of the project name and/or address should be used.
  6. Mechanical gates are permitted but should be of wood, wrought iron or other approved material.
  7. No sentry or barrier gates (gates with mechanical arms) will be allowed except in parking lots or storage areas.
  8. Shiny aluminum, chain link or other shiny fencing material are not permitted.

3.4 Fences, Walls Above Grade, and Retaining Walls

Within Deer Crest, walls and fences may be employed to provide privacy, enclose domestic pets or screen service areas. Retaining walls may be used to control erosion or access steeper property. However, fencing property around boundary lines will not be permitted. The placement of walls and fences should respect existing land forms and pedestrian access, follow existing contours, be sensitive to site vegetation and integrate with existing or proposed structural massing. Fence and wall designs should harmonize with the site and the buildings in both scale and appearance.


No walls, fences or combinations thereof, whether adjacent to buildings or separated from them, may exceed 6 feet in height above finished grade as specified in these Design Guidelines. All designs for walls and fences to screen service areas or provide privacy are subject to review by the DRC.


The exposed surface of retaining walls may exceed 6 feet in height with DRC approval for difficult accesses to steep sloping sites. The maximum height of a single retaining wall is 10 feet from finished grade to top of wall as per Wasatch County Code. At any allowable height, multiple walls may be stepped up a slope at a minimum horizontal spacing of 6 feet from front top of upper wall to front top of lower wall. All retaining walls must be engineered and must be within the limits of disturbance of a parcel or lot. Walls required for special site conditions may be approved by the DRC (See Appendix E / Diagram 1).


Any retaining walls that intersect the structural cross section of the subdivision roadways at any depth must be engineered accordingly to maintain the stability of the roads. A construction document submittal to the Wasatch County Engineering Department and separate building permit will be required for such conditions that typically occur on lots that are accessed from the high side of the property.


No fences or walls will be allowed along ski trails without the permission of the Design Review Committee.


Acceptable materials for walls above grade include:

Acceptable materials for fencing include: Unacceptable fencing materials include:
  • Logs
  • Wrought iron
  • Tubular steel
  • Wood (gates only) as specifically approved by the DRC
  • Stone masonry
  • Chain link
  • Split rail
  • Picket
  • Steel Pipe
  • Other types or styles not in keeping with the Deer Crest theme.
Retaining walls may be composed
of the following materials:
The following materials are prohibited:
  1. Rock
  2. Stacked rock
  3. Rock-faced concrete
  1. Concrete block
  2. Welded wire mesh
  3. Exposed Concrete

Stacked rock retaining walls exceeding 4'-0" in height must comply with the details noted in Appendix E.


3.4.1 Concrete Guardrail

In locations where a standard steel vehicular guardrail is required to run across the front of certain Deer Crest Estate lots an alternate design solution has been approved. A stone faced concrete retaining wall is an acceptable substitute for the standard steel guardrail as long as it meets the design criteria of the diagram noted in Appendix E (#10).


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3.5 Signage

A coordinated and united signage system is proposed for Deer Crest to provide both graphic and visual continuity. Signage design standards will be coordinated and established by the DRC based on these Design Guidelines.


A well-coordinated system of directional and informational signage is necessary within large-scale projects such as Deer Crest to clarify and provide information to visitors and residents and to reinforce the community's continuity and harmony. Signs perform three primary functions:

  1. They identify place and accessibility
  2. They indicate danger and provide warning or cautionary data
  3. They provide information concerning location, routing and traffic flow

Information on signs should be clear and concise, and signs should be located in obvious areas to assure visibility. Lettering styles should be uniform and bold yet simple. Color schemes with contrasting colors, especially light colors on dark backgrounds, are the most readable and noticeable from longer distances. The sign system should also include a graphic or logo to reinforce the Deer Crest identity and image.


Whenever possible, signs should be organized into unified systems, combined with lighting fixtures and kiosks or located in highly visible, well-lighted areas. Informational signs should be located in areas where people gather, change direction or change mode of travel. They should be placed where they can be incorporated with the design of other site elements and where they allow safe pedestrian clearance and are not in conflict with door openings or vehicular and equipment operation. Where critical routing is necessary, directional information and arrows should be provided to aid people in traveling quickly and easily to their destinations. Signs that give direction to handicapped access points and facilities should be utilized. The success of a comprehensive signage program for Deer Crest is dependent upon a uniform and consistent application of established design standards with all types of signs, whether incidental or informational.


It is important to ensure that the requirements for signage are met with efficient, functional signs that are aesthetically pleasing and durable. Sign failure can result from poor workmanship, improper materials, inadequate maintenance, and/or misunderstanding as to the environmental conditions anticipated and performance standards expected. To ensure that signage systems meet expectations, the following standards should be considered:

  1. Sign materials should be such that they can withstand weather conditions and be generally damage proof
  2. Signing systems should require minimum painting and be rust and pit proof
  3. Color should be fade resistant
  4. Signs should be equipped with break-away supports for safety and ease of repair and maintenance
  5. Signs should be fireproof or fire retardant
  6. Signs included in the system to meet state and federal requirements should be reflective but free from annoying glare
  7. Support and anchoring devices for signage systems should accommodate and/or exceed building code standards and state requirements
  8. If signage material is aluminum, all materials and applications should be in accordance with established procedures and standards
  9. Refer to Appendix "J" for Sales Signage Guidelines
  10. Refer to Appendix "K" for Construction Signage Guidelines
3.5.1 Sign Categories and Sizes

Categories of signs and size of signs are addressed for better clarification:

  1. Temporary Directional signs consist of open house signs, Home tour signs, and homeowner events. These signs will only be allowed within the gates and can not exceed 2' wide x 3' tall. They must be commercially produced and must be removed immediately after the designated event.
  2. Lot or Sales Signs consist of signs for identifying Lots or Homes for Sale. They are 48" wide x 40" tall. The template for this sign has a dark green background with the Deer Crest logo and the address location. Below this can be all other pertinent information, such as Architect, Builder, Realtor, Owner and any other contact information. These signs may be purchased through Park City Signs at (435) 649-1235 or CRC deSign at (435) 654-5965. For sign placement and required frames contact either Park City Signs or Josh at Iron horse signs (435) 640-7485.
  3. Home address signs are for easy identification of homes for emergency vehicles, guests and snow removal. This sign can be a pilaster, a large stone or an ornamental statue. It is required to be lit at night with 4" x 8" identifying numbers and be visible at all times. It will be built out of material complementary to the home. It will need to be located at the front of the driveway and be at least 3' from the curb and at least 3' tall to allow for snow accumulation and still remain visible with approval from the DRC.

3.6 Lighting

Lighting in Deer Crest should provide both illumination and security. Lighting can also add a special dimension to the development at night. Lighting should be provided in areas that receive heavy pedestrian or vehicular use and in areas that are potentially dangerous when unlit.


Different types of use areas require different lighting solutions. Flooding areas with light can detract from the subtle play of light and dark and emphasize the lack of people in a space. Often an area may need only the addition of individual light sources rather than an increase in light levels to correct a problem. The most important factors to be considered are:

  1. Support standard design and height;
  2. Lamp types and characteristics;
  3. Light intensity and distribution; and
  4. Lighting of hazardous locations.

Pedestrian lighting can be L.E.D., incandescent or metal halide for truer color rendition, placed along walkways at the manufacturer's specified spacing, and located so that fixtures do not interfere with pedestrian or vehicular movement. Extra-long life lamps may also be used. Additional overhead lighting or supplemental low-level units should be utilized adjacent to grade transitions, seating areas, pedestrian nodes, and areas where special hazards exist.


Parking lot and private driveway lights should meet Wasatch County and/or Park City and Utah Department of Transportation standards where applicable, be a complementary style, and be in character with the overall theme and image established for Deer Crest. For the sake of economy, lighting standards should be installed at the same time an area is developed. Electricity should be fed underground to the standards from nearby buildings unless a separate common metering system is in place.


The light fixtures along all internal roadways have been custom designed for Deer Crest and will be maintained by the DCMA. All other exterior light fixtures are subject to approval by the DRC. Light fixtures must minimize the amount of glare into neighboring homes and public areas.


In all cases lighting should be designed to minimize or eliminate light pollution and overthrow of light onto adjacent properties. All exterior lighting is to be indirect and shielded to prevent spillover onto adjacent lots and the street. Exposed bulbs, spot lights, reflectors, and lenses are prohibited. No flood lighting will be allowed in open space areas or on vacant property. In addition, every effort should be made to provide the most energy efficient solutions to lighting outdoor areas. Lighting plans should be coordinated with overall lighting plans established by the DRC to balance site lighting, coordinate fixture types and locations, and minimize duplication. Detailed lighting plans should be prepared for review and approval by the DRC. Plans should show lighting locations, intensities, heights, fixture design and light sources.


3.7 Landscape Structures and Site Furnishings

The development of outdoor spaces and landscaping often includes structures and site furnishings (decks, gazebos, benches, playground equipment, drinking fountains, trash receptacles, kiosks). These elements should be designed as extensions of the architecture and the spaces rather than as separate items. Additionally, landscape structures and site furnishings should conform to the common site character established for the development. These are among the elements of Deer Crest which serve to reinforce design character, facilitate pedestrian and skier use, and enliven the outdoor spaces.


These general objectives should guide design decisions relative to site elements:
  1. Components should be functional in form, related in design, simple in fabrication and standardized in appearance.
  2. A limited vocabulary of materials should be selected for proven durability and ease of maintenance.
  3. Elements of similar function should be clustered in units or groupings.
  4. Location and placement of furnishings should logically respond to patterns, types and intensity of usage.
  5. Components should be located to optimize public safety and not restrict emergency vehicle access.
  6. Furnishing design and placement should not obstruct efficient surface maintenance and cleaning operations.
  7. Maximum serviceability and coordination must be maintained for all utilities.
  8. Site elements should allow "barrier free" access by all people including the elderly and physically challenged.
  9. All landscape design approvals must adhere to County code as required by Wildland - Urban Interface code.

On all ski easements, anything deemed to be hazardous or impeding to skier traffic will not be allowed. The DRC can require a setback to allow a minimum buffer between the trail and any excavation or construction. Materials to be used can include trees, tall shrubs, wood fenceing or other skier designed fencing.


3.8 Amenities

Deer Crest is proposed to include recreational amenities for the use and benefit of the development's residents and guests. These amenities will include two ski lifts and 50 acres of ski trails operated as a part of the Deer Valley Resort, as well as privately-owned swimming pools for homeowners, hotels and condominium developments.


Swimming pool equipment shall be located in a manner complying with all applicable Wasatch County regulations and ordinances. Location of the equipment should minimize the impact of noise on neighboring lots. Pool design must be reviewed and approved by a licensed engineer and Wasatch County. All pool equipment must be fully enclosed with solid walls and a solid gate, which match the color of the adjacent building. Landscape screens or wood fences can be used in place of solid walls and gates. Pool equipment must be either below grade or set back at least thirty (30) feet from the rear and side setback property lines. Swimming pools must be designed to drain into the sewer system.


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4.0 SINGLE FAMILY ESTATE LOTS

The Design Guidelines encourage site sensitive home building designs, which work with the land and optimize the relationships of driveways, building massing, ce and vegetation. Design of homes should avoid imposing singular massing in favor of multiple wall planes and low eave lines below sloped should be designed as a family and be of consistent detail. The Design Guidelines encourage building materials that include stone, rough hewn wood walls, copper and other non-combustible roofing materials of dark coloration and accent materials reflecting our mountain setting.


4.1 On-Lot Site Planning

To receive approval for any site plan and associated architectural designs and obtain a subsequent building permit for a property in Deer Crest, the property owner must meet the requirements of the following entities (see Section 3.0 for additional details):

No building permit, plat amendment or any other request requiring Wasatch County or Park City approval will be submitted for their approval without first getting the approval stamp of the Design Review Committee(DRC).


The DRC, and Wasatch County or Park City municipal will expect "good planning practices" to be followed by each property owner and his selected consultants. Consequently, a summary of those practices is included here.


The first step in site design is a careful analysis of a given parcel or lot to identify its natural features, constraints and opportunities. This analysis must, at minimum, include a careful examination of the following site considerations:

  1. Existing vegetation with recommendations for preservation and removal of plant material of 4-inch diameter at breast height (dbh) or larger trunk caliper
  2. Points of access and recommended driveway or entrance alignments
  3. Hydrology and water resources
  4. Wind and storm patterns
  5. Existing and potential views
  6. Existing landforms and grades
  7. Building envelopes for construction
  8. Location of existing utilities
  9. Relationship to adjacent homes or other land uses
  10. Sunlight/solar exposure and light patterns

This site analysis is meant to serve as a basis for decision-making during the site design process. In preparing designs, the intent is to preserve and protect the environmental and scenic quality of a site and respect the integrity of adjacent development and land uses. Any improvements on the recommendations presented in these guidelines or more in-depth research of factors affecting the physical planning and development of any site are encouraged. The site evaluation should make use of relevant consultants--architects, civil engineers, soils engineers, landscape architects, geologists and other specialists--as required. It should draw upon topographic and vegetation surveys, site photographs, soils reports, site visits and any other documentation helpful in forming an accurate picture of the site's condition. Additional specific design expectations are outlined below.


4.1.1 Existing Land Forms

Each property has its own unique natural features, i.e. significant vegetation, drainage ways, large boulders, rock outcrops, steep slopes. In general, these features need to be considered and analyzed prior to the development of a property. In some cases, these conditions present opportunities that can benefit a development if preserved or properly utilized. In other cases, natural features may present constraints to development that will require mitigation to minimize potential impacts. It is the task of each property owner and their consultants to arrive at a site design that integrates and preserves these features. The purpose of the required initial survey and existing conditions mapping is to catalogue each site's unique features so these can be preserved during site improvement.


4.1.2 Existing Site Vegetation

Aesthetically speaking, the health and beauty of Deer Crest is largely dependent upon the preservation of existing vegetation and the restoration of disturbed areas. In preparation of the site development plan, care has been taken to preserve major vegetative masses. Within each property, a building envelope has been established by the Developer and limits of disturbance surrounding this building envelope must be established during the planning process (see section 4.1.5 below). Within these limits of disturbance, the property owner and their consultants have some freedom regarding removal of vegetation with approval of the DRC and consideration of the site's opportunities. Owners are encouraged to integrate and preserve as much existing vegetation as possible. Revegetation of all disturbed areas will be required. Relocation outside the limits of disturbance of plant material to be removed is encouraged.


A clearing plan for the building area must be prepared and submitted for DRC approval prior to removal of any vegetation. All trees over 4-inch dbh caliper must be identified. In cases where removal of trees larger than 4 inches dbh is deemed necessary, written approval must be obtained from the DRC.


In the preparation of a final site plan, the property owner may wish to include a site feature such as a pool, gazebo, walkway or deck. If such feature falls outside the building envelope (see Section 4.1.5), approval from the DRC and Wasatch County is required. Vegetation removal for any given property should be minimized and must be coordinated with the DRC.


4.1.3 On Site Planning

The limits of disturbance on each lot shall be minimized. Clusters of vegetation and large tree specimens shall be preserved where possible or where required by the Design Review Committee. Such clusters of vegetation and large trees shall be identified on a preliminary landscape plan which shall be submitted to the Design Review Committee with the first submittal of proposed improvement plans.


4.1.4 View Corridors

In developing the site and building designs, with regard to views, the following must be considered:

As far as possible, pristine natural views should be preserved and protected. The design of buildings and other man made features as well as new vegetative plantings should consider the natural views from other properties. Unsightly views such as unmitigated hillside scarring, exposed maintenance or service areas, and open rubbish heaps will not be allowed.


Preservation of existing mature vegetation close to the buildings will allow select views through the trees while still providing natural screening and a degree of privacy for the buildings themselves.


To protect the views of uphill lots and the privacy of downhill lots, the following planting philosophy shall be adopted for the lots:

When growth obstructs the views of a neighboring lot, shrubs can be naturally topped. Selected interior prunings of trees during young growth, and the pruning of heads, are techniques to be employed regularly by the owners. The DRC may require that trees be removed or pruned as necessary.


4.1.5 Location of Construction and Limits of Disturbance

Each lot on the Plat illustrates the maximum "building envelope" that will be allowed on single family estate lots. Within this building envelope, the property owner and his consultants must designate the "dwelling coverage" area.


A limit of Disturbance (LOD) fencing is to be installed before construction starts and maintained throughout the construction phase. This marking system will consist of "T" stakes, enough to support a brightly colored rope line on both sides of the lot from the edge of the road shoulder to the ski trail to identify the side edges. In areas that the brightly colored rope is not visible, brightly colored ribbon may be used as a visual aid to help distinguish the boundary line. The LOD must fall within the property boundary, but may be outside the building envelope, if necessary. The side yard limits of disturbance will typically project to the property line at the front of the property, thereby allowing use of the front yard area for construction access and staging. However, front yard limits may be imposed at the discretion of the DRC and Wasatch County or Park City on a case by case basis. The placement of seasonal ski fence adjacent to the ski runs and trails may be required and governed by DCMA. Additional LOD fencing may also be required at the discretion of the DCMA where temporary construction access to a lot may be allowed from areas other than the front yard or fencing may be required to maintain construction debris. At least 40% of disturbed areas outside of the dwelling coverage must be revegetated with trees and shrubs pursuant to Section 4.4.4.2 below.


Property owners are allowed "other impervious coverage" as noted in the Amended Density Determination for Telemark Park and outlined in charts provided in these Design Guidelines (Section 4.6.4). This other impervious coverage may be in the form of decks, patios, driveways and swimming pools and may fall outside the building envelope. Limits of disturbance for this other impervious coverage may extend an additional 5 feet beyond the edge of this other impervious coverage.


For each building, the area where grading and vegetation removal is allowed shall be 15 feet from the boundary of the platted Building Envelope or to the lot line, whichever is less. For those improvements that are permitted beyond the Building Envelope the limit of disturbance shall be 15 feet from the edge of the improvements as submitted to the building department, or to the property line, whichever is less. For those lots on which the building envelope abuts a setback line, excavation within the setback shall not be allowed unless approved by the DRC.


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4.2 Grading

To preserve existing land forms and site vegetation, grading plans for each property should be sensitive to the natural plant massing and features of the site. Grading and construction practices which disturb these natural features promote erosion and extensive revegetation. Building, roads and driveways should be carefully fitted to the site. Every effort should be made to minimize grading and excavation and to contain construction within fixed limits including materials storage and construction vehicle parking.


4.2.1 Erosion Control

To prevent erosion and maintain the essential quality of the site, the following construction practices are expected:

  1. Strict adherence to the set limits of disturbance including stockpiling, equipment parking, and traffic to be confined therein;
  2. Limits of disturbance will be fenced as stipulated in Section 4.1.5;
  3. Cuts and fills, when required for construction of roads, driveways and pathways, should conform to accepted engineering practices with naturally rounded tops and toes of slopes. Revegetation is required on all cut and fill slopes.
  4. During and after construction, the following erosion control practices must be implemented:
    1. During Construction:
      1. Temporary stockpiles of topsoil must be stabilized either by mulching or covering
      2. Temporary runoff channels must be built to drain construction zones; in areas draining two acres or less, channels must have silt screens installed at appropriate locations; silt screens should consist of plastic fabric stretched across and anchored to the bottom of the channels with hay bales placed on the upstream side of the fabric; where watershed above the site exceeds two acres, temporary earthen berms must be used in lieu of silt screens.
      3. All storm drain inlet structures must be protected by a filter berm until the area is stabilized with vegetation or the base course of pavement is installed.
    2. After Construction:
      1. All embankments constructed as part of cut/fill operations will be seeded and mulched as soon as final grading has been completed.
      2. All building site areas must be seeded and mulched as soon as final grading has been completed.
4.2.2 Site Grading Requirements

All demolition, clearing, grubbing, stripping of soil, excavation, compaction, and grading must be completed within the owner's property area in accordance with all applicable Wasatch County or Park City regulations and ordinances. Open slope landscaping and roadways damaged by any construction of any property owner shall be replaced by the lot owner at the lot owner's expense. At the discretion of the Design Review Architect, a soils engineering report can be required and acted upon at any time during construction.


4.2.3 Driveway Grading

Heated driveways are encouraged and driveway slopes should not exceed 12% at any point. If site conditions require that any point along a driveway exceeds 12% then a snow melt system is recommended. Changes in the grade along the length of the driveway must be designed in accordance with recognized civil engineering road design standards and this information must be clearly indicated on the driveway design plans. Abrupt changes in grade are not acceptable.


Where snow melt driveway systems are installed the shoulder strip approximately six feet in width or approach from the roadway servicing the residence should be provided with its own separate zone. This will prevent costly replacement in the event that the utilities in the shoulder need to be worked on at some point in time.


Driveways sloping down to the street from the building must include drainage structures to control run-off rates and channel the water to culverts to prevent water from running out into the street. Two alternative approaches are:

  1. Provide cross slope on driveways to direct water to one side where a rock lined culvert of at least 24" width can collect and slow the water. This culvert would be flared to 6' in width as it flows into the existing street culvert and must direct water down the culvert instead of onto the street and/or provide a catch basin with appropriate slopes to catch water above the street. This catch basin must be sized and configured to collect the water draining down the driveway and then direct it in pipes to a daylight opening near the street culvert or a direct connection into existing storm drain system.
  2. Driveways sloping down to property from streets must include drainage systems to divert water around the building that is lower than the street without allowing it to pond or drain into garages, entrances or window wells.
4.2.4 Driveway Handrails

Handrails are required for one side of a driveway when the driveway exceeds a grade steeper than 1:10 (6.67%). This requirement can be eliminated if a sidewalk is provided to the main entrance to the residence from the street which it fronts.


4.3 Drainage

Each property has its own natural drainage pattern resulting from its topography and vegetation. Whenever possible, this drainage pattern shall be preserved so as to allow runoff from the open areas of the site to flow into and through established drainage areas. As a condition to the approval of a development plan by the DRC, each Owner who affects natural drainage patterns may be required to grant a permanent drainage easement on their lot, where runoff is diverted into the existing natural drainage swales. All drainage swales must be either mulched and planted or stabilized by other means immediately following construction.


Each Lot owner will be required to develop a site drainage plan in conjunction with the site grading plan. Where required by Wasatch County of the approved Deer Crest plans and specifications, this plan shall include a storage/infiltration system which meets the requirements set forth in the approved Deer Crest plans and specifications for individual Lot drainage. The design and installation of these on-lot drainage systems is the responsibility of the Lot owner. DCMA is required to maintain, repair, or replace these systems as required by Wasatch County.


The approved Deer Crest plans and specifications require the installation of special on-lot drainage control systems and structures on Lots 16 - 38, 47 - 51, 79 and 93 of Deer Crest Estates Subdivision - Phase 1. Wasatch County may add additional Lots to this list as additional Lots are platted. As a condition to the approval of a development plan by the Design Review Committee, each Owner of the above mentioned lots may be required to document in a recordable easement the location of permanent drainage structures and drainage system facilities on the Lot and be approved by a licensed civil engineer that drainage will not be adversely affected..


Natural drainage patterns and necessary drainage structures and systems may impact the building areas of Lots as shown on the applicable plats.


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4.4 Landscaping

Plant materials perform a variety of extremely important functions. They reinforce and define the forms and spaces, separate and screen pedestrians and automobiles, direct and buffer winds creating desirable micro-climatic conditions, and enhance the architecture of the environment. The placement, choice, maintenance and replacement of plant materials in Deer Crest is an important component of the development. The revegetation of disturbed areas and the landscaping of newly developed areas is an integral part of the design process. A strong relationship between the planting and other architectural and natural features of the site is essential to obtain a balanced, unified development. If vegetation is disrupted outside the building envelope due to construction, it must be replaced through an updated and approved landscape plan.


4.4.1 Revegetation

Every property owner and developer should seek to minimize the impact of construction on the existing landscape. However, some disruption will be inevitable. Correcting the damage done during the construction process requires revegetation. To the greatest extent possible, revegetation should recreate the earlier character of the site using indigenous shrubs and trees.


4.4.2 New Plantings

A minimum schedule of trees shall include six 72-inch box or larger or 20 foot or taller trees or as determined by the DRC. New plantings should be located in a way that respects and emulates existing plant patterns and communities. Trees, shrubs and ground covers are usually found in groups of similar species rather than isolated or integrated with a number of other species. New plantings should follow the patterns characteristic of the site and its environs and blend smoothly with the existing conditions. As a general rule, coniferous trees should be placed on the north and east sides of building lots and deciduous trees on the south and west to preserve existing sunlight patterns. A detailed landscape plan showing methods for preserving and including existing vegetation in development designs should be provided to the DRC in the Construction Documents Package submitted by the owner's architect prior to plan review.


Special attention should be paid to the use of drought tolerant and fire resistant plantings to minimize consumption of water, preserve resources, and reduce fire hazards. A listing of fire resistant plant materials is included in Appendix B.


Ornamental plantings should only occur at entrances, plazas, courtyards and in planters adjacent to buildings to add variety and interest to the pedestrian areas and to emphasize the importance of an area. These landscaped areas serve to soften paved areas and cold architectural spaces and encourage pedestrian use and activity. Landscaped areas should be planned as an integral part of the project development and not simply located in left-over space.


No plant material should be located in drip lines under building eaves that do not have gutters. Plant materials should be selected for structure, texture, color, ultimate size, hardiness, fire resistance and drought tolerance.


Fir (conifer) trees are recommended to mitigate safety concerns along ski trails.


Special consideration should be given to planting installations along common roadways of the subdivision. Because of snow removal landscape materials placed in these locations can be damaged or destroyed over the course of a winter season. Deer Crest is not responsible for replacing landscape materials placed in close proximity to roadways and damaged by snow removal practices.


4.4.3 Solar Orientation and Views

Solar aspect and the views of others should be considered in designing for new plantings so that existing patterns of sunlight and view corridors are not obscured. The present and future impact of plantings on adjoining sites should be carefully assessed. New plantings that create major interference with the views or solar access of neighboring properties may not be permitted.


4.4.4 On-Lot Landscape Standards

The Deer Crest Landscape Plant Palette is included as Appendix C to these Design Guidelines. The listing includes plant species that have been recommended for incorporation into the landscape plans of the individual lots and parcels. Any variations from these lists will be approved at the sole discretion of the DRC.


4.4.4.1 Planting Standards

The landscape plan for each lot or parcel should be designed to complement the overall landscape plan for Deer Crest. Accordingly, plant palettes listed in these Design Guidelines should be used for selecting all plant materials. Trees and shrubs should provide the principal landscape image for the community. Use of herbaceous and short-lived plants should be minimized. Shrubs and ground covers should completely cover the soil when mature. Slope surface stabilization should consist of ground cover plant material, wild flowers and grasses to be hydroseeded or installed by another method appropriate to the plant type and area. Selection and installation of plant materials should take maintenance and water usage requirements into account.


4.4.4.2 Installation Standards

It is recommended that all irrigation and planting installation be undertaken by the property owner or competent personnel licensed to perform such work under a Utah State Contractor's License or equivalent. It is recommended that contractors performing construction and installation work provide a minimum one (1) year guarantee from time of completion of all work on all work and materials.


On-property planting will cover all disturbed slopes and at least forty (40%) percent of limits of disturbance other than dwelling coverage and other impervious area. Removal of plantings on slopes installed by developer and all other on-property planting installed by the developer will be prohibited except upon approval of the DRC. Existing trees along the roadway removed after approval for any reason will be replaced with the same species of tree of a like size, or as large a size as is commercially available, in approximately the same location.


Landscaping installations will be finished (according to approved plans) within 90 days after the final Wasatch County building inspection of any structure, weather permitting. The only exception will be if final building inspection occurred during winter months, then landscaping shall be completed as soon as possible in the spring.


Vegetation of varying heights and textures shall be placed along the perimeter walls and fences to soften hard planes and to create interest.


Refer to Section 4.4.2 for a disclaimer related to placing plantings along roadways


4.4.4.3 Irrigation Standards

Landscaped areas should be provided with a suitable permanent method for watering all plantings. Irrigation systems shall be used that offer state-of-the-art delivery of water to plantings in the most conserving manner available. Care should be taken not to excessively irrigate existing plant materials or create overly wet ground conditions that might result in root rot. Proper drainage must be provided.


Within Deer Crest, the irrigated area is that portion of a lot or parcel which may be irrigated or planted in non-native plants using additional water. The actual irrigated area will be shown on the final plat. The Jordanelle Special Services District will establish water rate schedules penalizing excessive landscape watering.


The maximum area of permanent spray irrigation for landscaped lawns should be limited to 1,600 sf with a maximum slope of 3:1. Additional permanent drip irrigation for ornamental planting beds, shrubs and trees should be limited to 4,500 sf. Other temporary irrigation for slope stabilization or establishing stable root systems are and will be reviewed on a case by case basis by the DRC and Wasatch County.


All irrigation systems shall be designed by a landscape architect or an irrigation specialist to insure efficient water management and plant growth. The irrigation system for each lot must be designed so that water does not cross property lines (see Section 7.2 "The Process," No. 2 - C).


The irrigation designer shall consider environmental conditions such as sun and shade, soils, terrain, percolation rates, moisture sensing, erosion control and wind.


All landscape areas must be irrigated with a permanent below grade irrigated system controlled by individual homeowners with automatic control valves. Low precipitation heads shall be utilized for maximum water conservation and slope stability. Pop up type heads should be used adjacent to driveways and walkways. These systems should be installed as soon as possible after construction and prior to placement of plant material.


Use of proven name-brand equipment, tensiometers and automatic controllers is highly recommended.


With the exception of slopes, impact heads shall not be permitted for on lot irrigation systems. All systems shall be of "spray type" or "drip" heads, adjusted to trim to the property line. In no case shall heads throw over adjacent drives or to neighboring structures.

See section 7.2 of these guidelines for a description of the information that is to be included in the site development and landscape plans for individual lots.


4.4.4.4 Maintenance Standards

As part of the landscape installation program, a ninety (90) day landscape warranty period shall be included to allow the contractor a period to insure correct installation and satisfactory plant health, prior to acceptance of his work by the property owner.


On-property maintenance shall be performed on a weekly basis, and shall include:

No excessive use of water to flush or clean hard surfaces will be permitted. Only electric leaf blowers will be permitted.


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4.5 Snow Management

The effects of snow and ice build-up, if improperly handled, can be destructive to buildings, pose risks to pedestrians and vehicles, and impose high ongoing snow removal and maintenance costs. The heavy snows and extreme freeze/thaw cycle of Deer Crest combine to make snow management an important design consideration. Architects and designers not thoroughly familiar with snow country design should retain a consultant early in the design process. Snow dump areas must not be accessible by pedestrians or skiers. The design for each lot shall consider the following:

  1. The basic building form must be conducive to snow management.
  2. Snow and drainage from roofs may not be dumped onto adjoining streets or properties.
  3. Snow accumulation shall be managed on an ongoing basis.
  4. Snow must be positively shed or retained. The owner may use snow diverters, snow retainers or vary roof pitch and roof materials for snow retention. Snow diverters or snow retainers must be designed as an integral part of the roofscape.
  5. Entrances and pedestrian routes must be fully protected from snow sheds and icicles. Shedding snow must be deflected from pedestrian areas by dormers, angled roofs, canopies or other means.
  6. Deicing salts are prohibited due to the damage caused to structures.
  7. Snow dump areas must not be accessible to pedestrians.
  8. Building projections shall be durable.
  9. Roofs dumping snow onto a series of lower roofs or onto a lower roof from great height must be prohibited because shedding snow can cause extreme snow loads or impact loads respectively.
  10. Balconies shall not be planned such that they are subject to dangerous amounts of shedding snow.
  11. Heated driveways and walkways.

4.6 Building Envelope and Controls

4.6.1 Building Envelope

The building envelope for each lot is as shown on the recorded subdivision plat. No supported decks or structures will be allowed outside the Building Envelope nor are they allowed to encroach upon the setbacks established by the recorded subdivision plat. Unsupported roof overhangs may encroach on the setbacks up to 2'. Other improvements can be beyond this envelope so long as the maximum impervious surface area ratios outlined in the Single Family Subdivision Lot Design Standards of the Density Determination are still followed. These structures may include, but are not limited to: patios, pools, spas, pool decking, ponds, landscaping, sport courts, driveways and walkways.


Each lot on the Plat illustrates the maximum building envelope that will be allowed on single family estate lots. The "other impervious coverage" as permitted under the Amended Density Determination may extend beyond the building envelope subject to an approval of the site plan by the DRC. Any actual structures proposed to be constructed on the lot may reflect a smaller size than the number shown on the plat.


Only unsupported roof overhangs may encroach on the setbacks. No supported decks or structures will be allowed to encroach into setbacks or beyond the edge of the building envelope. These conditions will be reviewed and approved or disapproved by the DRC on a case by case basis.


Setback Requirements Minimum Setbacks Single Family: Front Lot Line: 20 feet; Rear Lot Line: 30 Feet; Side Lot Line: 20 Feet; Distance from Road Centerline: 45 Feet.


4.6.2 Building Character and Scale

Single Family Dwellings in Deer Crest are usually restricted to 2 ½ stories or less. Higher buildings must be stepped back or otherwise respond to pedestrian scale (see Section 4.6.6 "Maximum Building Height").


Façade design shall display a finished appearance on all sides of the building. The design of the upper façade of buildings is important to the scale and texture of Deer Crest. The building faces are envisioned as a rich collection of varied yet harmonious facades, adding interest, scale and rhythm to the project.


For stacked floor plate designs, the floor area of succeeding or higher stories of a dwelling must be no larger than 75% of the next lower story if that lower story, as measured by the intersection of the floor plate plane with natural grade, is 50% or more above natural grade. In split-level designs such ratio is by reference to the floor directly below as opposed to the half-story.


Proposed variations from this guideline are subject to review and may be approved by the DRC and Wasatch County on a lot specific basis without obligation to any other Lot owners in the project.


Building façades must include architectural features including bay windows, balconies, dormers and façade detailing as textural elements which strengthen the scale and resort images.


Building façades shall give a substantial appearance, and openings shall display a "punched" appearance. Curtain walls or façades incorporating long horizontal strip windows are not permitted.


Covered decks, balconies and porches are strongly encouraged as they provide usable outdoor space and add life and interest to the street. Every living unit shall have a spot to catch the sun.


4.6.3 Building Bulk Criteria

To the extent possible, buildings in the development should conform to the following criteria in order to attain architectural forms visually related to the shapes of the mountains and to achieve strong architectural ties to the landscape.


Buildings shall step from level to level as possible. Unbroken vertical elevations shall be avoided; and elevations designed to emphasize horizontal lines by use of stepped levels and/or balconies and decks are encouraged.


4.6.4 Dwelling and Other Impervious Coverage of the Lot

Individual lot coverage calculations are included in these design guidelines as Appendix D. Those calculations can be used to check calculations prepared using the tables in this section.


Maximum Dwelling Coverage: Within each lot, the Preliminary and Final Plat designate the maximum size of allowable structures in plan view, including eaves, overhangs, and outbuildings which may be constructed on the lot. This is not the Floor Area, but the area of Dwelling Coverage.


Within each lot, the Preliminary and Final Plat designate the maximum areas of impervious surface allowed on a lot in addition to the Dwelling Coverage, including driveways, concrete slabs, walkways, steps and other surfaces impervious to water. The coverage's shown on the following tables are approved for single family lots within the Deer Crest project.


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Note regarding maximum impervious coverage: Other Impervious Coverage maximums may be increased if all of the Dwelling Coverage allowance is not used in the design of the home. Maximum Combined Impervious Coverage may be increased only when driveway areas outside of the building envelope are required to meet County fire rules and when controlled runoff is designed and approved by a licensed civil engineer indicating that drainage will not be adversely affected by the additional impervious coverage of the driveway.


SINGLE FAMILY LOT COVERAGE TABLES
Lot Area Dwelling Increment (square feet) Coverage Factor for Increment Maximum Coverage in Square feet Total Coverage in Square Feet
For the first 11,000 s.f. 26% Coverage up to 2,860 up to 2,860
For the next 11,000 s.f. (11,001-22,000) 18% Coverage up to an additional 1,980 sf. up to 4,840
For the next 11,000 sf.(22,001-33,000) 8% Coverage up to an additional 880 sf. up to 5,720
For the next 11,000 sf. (33,001-44,000) 4% Coverage up to an additional 440 sf. up to 6,160
For Area above 44,001 sf. 3%

As an example of using the above table, consider a 15,000 sf. lot: The Total Dwelling Coverage would be computed as follows: For the first 11,000 sf. of Lot Area, coverage of 26% applies. For the Lot Area above 11,001, a coverage factor of 18% applies. 26% of 11,000 = 2,860 + 18% of 4,000 (15,000 - 11,000) = 720 for a total of 3,580 sf.


MAXIMUM SINGLE FAMILY LOT "OTHER IMPERVIOUS" COVERAGE GUIDELINES:
Lot Area Increments (sf.) Maximum Other Coverage (%) Maximum Other Coverage (sf.) Maximum Total Other Coverage (sf.)
up to 11,000 15.0% 1,650 1,650
11,001-22,000 10.0% 1,100 2,750
22,001-33,000 5.0% 550 3,300
33,001-44,000 2.5% 275 3,575
44,001 + 2.0%

As an example of using the above Table, consider a 15,000 s.f. lot: The total other coverage would be 15% of 11,000 = 1,650 + 10% of 4,000 (15,000 - 11,000) = 400 for a total of 2,050 s.f.


CUMULATIVE MAXIMUM SINGLE FAMILY LOT "TOTAL IMPERVIOUS" COVERAGE GUIDELINES:
("DWELLING COVERAGE" + "OTHER IMPERVIOUS" COVERAGE)
Total Lot Area Increments (sf.) Total Dwelling Coverage (sf.) Total Other Coverage (sf.) Impervious Coverage (sf.)
Up to 11,000 2,860 1,650 4,510
11,001-22,000 4,840 2,750 7,590
22,001-33,000 5,720 3,300 9,020
33,001-44,000 6,160 3,575 9,735
44,000 +

As an example of using the above Table, consider a 15,000 sf. lot: The total impervious coverage would be the total of 3,580 sf. computed above and 2,050 sf. computed above for a total of 5,630 sf.


Note that the purpose of this requirement is to not only control the area that contributes to storm runoff on the property but also to reasonably limit the overall mass of roofs that are allowed on a single lot.


Dwelling coverage is further defined as an area measurement in plan view to the outermost edge of all impervious roofs on an approved building lot regardless of what lies below. An impervious roof for purposes of this definition is one which redirects water to an outside edge or to a drain for collection.


4.6.5 Floor Area

In order to develop a community of compatible values a minimum floor area for each house will be required. To insure that the intensity of each lot development is not excessive, a maximum floor area for each house is established. For a floor level to qualify as a basement it must meet both the follwing requirements:


  • The average floor to floor height must be 6 feet or more below finished grade.
  • The floor above can't be more than 12 feet above finished grade at any point.
  • Minimum Home Size

    The minimum custom home size is four thousand five hundred (4,500) square feet and the minimum footprint size is three thousand (3,000) square feet, with both figures calculated so as to exclude 600 square feet of the garage, subterranean basements and porches. These minimums may be reduced at the discretion of the DRC.

    Maximum Custom Home Size
    MAXIMUM SINGLE FAMILY LOT "FLOOR AREA" GUIDELINES:
    Lot Area Increments(Cumulative)(sf.) Maximum Total Floor Area (%) Maximum Total Floor Area (sf.) Maximum Total Floor(by increment)Area(sf.)
    Up to 11,000 45% 4,950 4,950
    11,000-22,000 30% 3,300 8,250
    22,001-33,000 15% 1,650 9,900
    33,001 + 8% n/a n/a

    As an example of using the above Table, consider a 15,000 sf. lot: The total floor area would be 45% of 11,000 = 4,950 + 30% of 4,000 (15,000 - 11,000) = 1,200 for a total of 6,150 sf.


    Dwellings in excess of 20,000 sf. of floor area must be approved by the Wasatch County Planning Commission on an individual basis.


    Floor Area includes area of all floor planes, excluding basements. Basements are defined as any area with no above grade exposure or areas having above grade exposure of 50% or less and ceiling heights of less than 12 feet


    4.6.6 Maximum Building Height

    Maximum height refers to the mid-point of a roof as measured from the ridge to the intersection of the roof and wall. Natural grade is defined as a plane formed by the corners of the dwelling prior to any excavation. When framing is "topped out", the contractor shall verify with a stamped survey document, that the height of their Design Review Committee (DRC) approved home is in conformance with the DRC approved permitted plans. This document must include a roof plan indicating to where the height measurement is taken from and shall be provided to the DRC Construction Coordinator.


    Single Family Dwellings: The maximum height of these buildings shall be 33 feet as measured from natural grade, chimneys and roof vents excepted.

    The certification of building height is required when the framing is "topped out", when all exterior wall and roof framing is in place. The contractor shall certify the building height at that time by providing a stamped survey document indicating that the height of the DRC approved home is in conformance with the DRC approved plans. This document must include a roof plan indicating the point where the height measurement is taken and shall be provided to the DRC construction coordiantor.


    4.6.6.1 Special Lot Height Restrictions

    The height of buildings is further restricted within the following lots as described below by reference to the building envelope within the affected lot. For example, a particular lot may be restricted at the rear edge of the building envelope to a height of 22' (or in certain cases a variable height from 22' at the northernmost point of the rear edge to 28' at the southernmost point of the rear edge). This specially restricted edge forms a level plane with the other normally defined edges of the building envelope, no part of the building will protrude through this projected plane unless an "ascending pitch" is specifically permitted in the table below. The new sloped plane becomes the plane through which building penetrations are not allowed. Specific DRC approval will be required for any design utilizing the "ascending pitch" application as described in the table below.


    The following table describes the special restrictions for certain individual lots. Please refer to the attached Appendix F for the individual lot restrictions (when a conflict occurs in the interpretation of the verbal description in this paragraph with the graphical representation in Appendix E, the Appendix representation shall prevail). The DRC may approve variations from the special height restrictions at the sole discretion of the DRC without consultation or approval of any owner of lots in Deer Crest; owners of lots should not rely upon the special height restrictions of this section in their consideration of the building height of any adjacent lots.


    Lot # Building envelope front edge Building envelope rear edge Building envelope all edges Permitted ascending pitch from restricted edge up to the intersection with the 33'* plane
    1NoneN: 22'-28' variableNone4 in 12
    2NoneW: 12'-16' variableNone4 in 12
    3NoneW: 16'-28' variableNone4 in 12
    4NoneW: 28'None4 in 12
    5NoneW: 24'-28' variableNone4 in 12
    928'22'NoneNone
    1028'22'NoneNone
    11 SE corner: 28'22'NoneNone
    15NoneN: 18'-31' variableNone4 in 12
    16NoneN: 22'None4 in 12
    17NoneN: 24'-28' variableNone4 in 12
    18NoneN: 20'-24' variableNone4 in 12
    19E: 24'NEC 28' variableNone NoneVariable
    20None18' + variableNoneVariable
    29NoneNone28'Variable
    3422'NoneNoneNone
    3522'NoneNoneNone
    3622'NoneNoneNone
    38S: 28'N: 22'NoneVariable
    4024'NoneNoneNone
    44None22'NoneNone
    45None22'NoneNone
    46None22'NoneNone
    5424'NoneNoneNone
    68NoneNone22'Variable
    6924'NoneNoneNone
    70 24'NoneNoneNone
    7124'NoneNoneNone
    7428'22' SWCNoneVariable
    7522'NoneNoneNone
    7622'NoneNoneNone
    8328'22'NoneNone
    8924'NoneNoneNone
    9024'NoneNoneNone
    9124'NoneNoneNone
    9224'NoneNoneNone
    94None22'NoneNone
    10224'NoneNoneNone
    103None22'NoneNone
    104None22'NoneNone
    10822'NWC 28'NoneVariable
    10924'NoneNoneNone
    11024'NoneNoneNone
    11124'NoneNoneNone
    11724'NoneNoneNone
    11922'28'NoneVariable
    120 22'28'NoneVariable
    12122'28'NoneVariable
    122NoneNone22'Variable
    131
    132
    133
    134
    135
    136
    137
    138
    139
    140
    141
    142
    143
    144
    145

    * Note: Where no ascending pitch is permitted the height envelope is assumed to be defined from the specially restricted edge on a level plane to the intersection with the 33' plane, refer to Appendix E #7.


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    4.6.7 Permitted Architectural "Projections"

    Chimneys, lightning rods, and other incidental architectural projections are permitted to reasonably exceed the height limits described above.


    4.6.8 Double Lot Purchases

    If a single home is planned to be built across the internal property lines of double/multiple lots, then the internal lot line must be eliminated. The resulting parcel shall be treated as one lot for all further purposes and such combination shall be deemed permanent. No lots, once combined, may be subdivided. The owner shall be required to file a Notice of Combination with the DCMA, which shall record such notice with the Wasatch County Recorder prior to commencement of construction. (The ownership of adjoining lots is not, by itself, evidence of combination or intent to combine, and combination is not deemed to have occurred unless and until a Notice of Combination has been recorded, or a structure built which crosses the common lot boundary line.)


    The resulting larger lot shall be allowed coverage, impervious area and dwelling size according to the tables proceeding as 1 lot, not the sum of the allowed areas prior to combination.


    The limits of disturbance area shall be revised by applying the ratio between the dwelling size allowed on the largest uncombined lot to the combined dwelling size allowed to the area of disturbance on the largest uncombined lot. The configuration of such area must meet all applicable setbacks and shall be subject to discretionary review by the DRC. DRC may disapprove the limits of disturbance based upon visual impact, vegetation impact and neighborhood compatibility. The Committee shall consider and rule upon such combinations prior to purchase if so requested.


    Each lot, regardless of whether it was part of a double lot purchase, shall be treated individually under the governing documents for Deer Crest. The voting privileges and payment of appropriate assessments to the DCMA will be based on the number of original lots in the purchase. Thus, where two lots are combined into one, the owner will be assessed for two lots and may vote for two lots. A lot combination may require a plat amendment process through Wasatch County.


    4.6.9 Unique Design Requirement

    The DRC specifically reserves the right to prohibit a given design in architectural plan and elevation from being repeated on two separate lots in Deer Crest. Change in elevation shall be defined as altering the design of several of the facade elements including, but not limited to, windows, doors, surface materials or colors, roof pitch and roofing materials. Any change in elevation must be consistently detailed on all sides of the home. The property owner is encouraged to work closely with the DRC in modifying elevations.


    4.7 Materials and Features

    4.7.1 Garages and On-Lot Parking

    Each Lot must contain a garage. For purposes of calculating allowable square footage the maximum allowable area for a garage shall be 600 sf. per dwelling. Larger garage areas will be counted against the total allowable floor area of the dwelling.


    Lot owners are encouraged to recess garage doors and individual bays in order to create depth and shadow pattern.


    Parking for residential uses is based on the size of the residential structure, as shown on the following table:


    Parking required for Residential Uses:
    Number of bedrooms Number of covered spaces Total number off-street spaces
    1-5 2 4
    6 2 5
    7+ 3 6+*
    * one additional space for each two additional bedrooms

    4.7.2 Exterior Walls Surfaces

    Stone and wood facades, stucco that is smooth, sand finish, and light to heavy dashcoat plaster are appropriate. Where stucco is used, joining marks between coats of stucco, because of scaffolding or construction techniques, must be avoided.


    4.7.2.1 Lower Surfaces

    Lower wall surfaces should be built of or finished with a hard surface durable material for wall protection from climatic conditions and to provide an aesthetic base to the architecture. The following materials are encouraged:

    If available in sufficient quality and quantity, use of local stone should be given high priority.


    4.7.2.2 Upper Surfaces

    Upper wall surfaces should be of durable material that creates a rural coastal forest sense of scale and warmth. Recommended materials include:

    Walls should be limited to a maximum of three different materials from the above list. Those three materials will be subject to review for compatibility and approval by the DRC.


    4.7.2.3 Wall Openings

    Window and door openings should be recessed on all elevations to accentuate the appearance of wall depth. Use of wood windows is highly encouraged. Window and door frames shall be constructed of wood, PVC coated wood, factory color coated aluminum or anodized aluminum. Window and door frames of natural aluminum finish and glazing material of reflective or color tint (other than bronze or gray) are prohibited. Glass tinting or shading must be compatible with the general color and style of the home. All tinted glass will be subject to review and approval by the DRC. Mirrored glass, reflective glass film and plastic roll-up shades shall not be permitted. Exterior shades or awnings of any type shall not be permitted. Windows cannot be painted or covered by foil, cardboard, sheets or other similar material.


    Openings in walls (doors and windows) should reinforce and strengthen the appearance of the wall and be integral with the function of the building.


    The exterior finishes of windows and doors should be of wood, PVC coated wood, factory color coated aluminum or anodized aluminum. Unfinished aluminum and metal is discouraged.


    4.7.2.4 Wall Appurtenances

    Wall decorations, shutters, bay windows, flower boxes, balconies and other wall appurtenances should be simple, functional, and well integrated with the total design.


    4.7.2.5 Wall Facing Materials

    The following materials are permitted on the face of residential walls. Finishes and colors should relate to the approved color and materials palette. Materials that match the home may be permitted on a case-by-case basis.


    Permitted Materials:


    In general, warm colors are encouraged for large field application and dark colors for trim and accents. Homes should seem to disappear into the landscape rather than stand out from it. Hence, the color of exterior materials, whether applied or innate, should reflect the appearance of the natural surroundings and not seem synthetic or man made. Accent colors should integrate with the overall color scheme and form of the building. Accent colors on wall surfaces can enliven or detract from the building and discrete use of such colors is encouraged.


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    4.7.3 Paving

    It is strongly encouraged that driveways (other than multiple access or over common areas which may be permitted to be asphalt) and other flat paved areas be concrete, exposed aggregate concrete, quarry tile, paving blocks, natural stone, or similar material. Entry paving will be subject to approval by the DRC. Asphalt paving within the lot shall only be permitted in select situations as determined by the DRC.


    4.7.4 Roofs

    Roof form shall be modulated. Roof form shall be broken up with the use of dormers, or other architectural features. The ridgeline should not be continuous but should be varied in height or broken with chimneys, cupolas, towers or other features.


    Horizontal relief: Eave lines, a major cornice/trim line, or other significant horizontal relief shall be located below the third story to bring the building down to a pedestrian scale. Consider coordination with adjoining eaves, peaks, gables and slopes. Exposed party walls are not acceptable.


    Roof snow handling characteristics:


    Snow splitters must be substantial, and fitted to all projections on sloped roofs that are not located close to the roof ridge (e.g. Chimneys, vents, skylights, etc.).


    Generally, conventional eaves troughs or built-in eaves troughs should be avoided as they are subject to damage from snowshed.


    Roof design shall consider the effect of slope, materials, construction, projections and slope/flat roof distribution on snow shedding characteristics.


    Roof design shall conform to the snow management plan. Roofs shall be designed to withstand the extreme freeze/thaw cycle at Deer Crest and its impact on snow shed, snow retention, roof drip, icicle management, ice dams, and water infiltration.


    Sloped roofs shed accumulated snow in avalanche fashion and can be dangerous to pedestrians below. The design of roofs and pedestrian areas below them shall conform to the snow management plan.


    4.7.4.1 Roof Shape and Ridge Alignment

    Roof shape is a predominant element for organizing building massing and relating buildings to their surroundings. Roof shape also becomes an important element to establish or convey a predominant style, but roofs must be considered very carefully to prevent the roofscape from dominating the architecture of the project. Roof designs should be functional and provide visual order to buildings and building masses. A single roof shape should dominate building masses to provide harmony. Roof ridge alignments should enhance the visual impact of the primary structure and other buildings on the site.


    The following roof shapes are encouraged:

    Large areas of subordinate flat roofs are not acceptable. A composition of sloped roofs is required in each project with small areas of flat roofs acceptable in multi-family/commercial areas. Roofs of connected and adjacent buildings must be fully coordinated.


    Not permitted are:


    4.7.4.2 Roof Slope

    Roof slope is a major force in establishing the roof's shape and subsequent impact. Slope is also an important functional element in shedding precipitation (rain and snow). The slope range considered acceptable for buildings in Deer Crest is between 4:12 and 10:12. Lesser slopes will be discouraged. Roofs should truncate above the ground and roofs on both sides of a ridge should be the same slope, but not necessarily the same length. Naturally, building codes must be met regarding the distance from the roof eaves to finish grade.


    Roof overhangs should be encouraged as extensions to protect walls, to protect and cover pedestrian traffic below, and to direct water shedding to desired locations. Roofs should not be designed to shed onto adjacent properties, walkways, paved areas, driveways or decks.


    4.7.4.3 Roof Surfacing Material

    Careful consideration should be given to selection of roofing materials. Color and texture are major elements in successfully blending buildings to the natural setting. The goal is to select roofing materials that are in harmony with nature and function to combat local weather conditions. Materials to consider include:


    Cedar shake and cedar shingles are prohibited due to fire risk. Concrete and fiberglass shakes and shingles as substitutes and metal roofs shall be selected so as to be functional and durable considering the effects of climate and snow. Asphalt shingles are prohibited.


    The color of roof materials must be generally neutral or muted in order to blend with or enhance the colors of the natural landscape. All roof flashing materials shall be pre-finished metal to match roof color. Consider the color of neighboring roofs to create a complementary roof palette; avoid selecting strongly contrasting colors. Thin wood trim sections are prohibited. Wood trim sections and eave lines should have substantial appearance.


    Roof Tiles:

    1. Roof tiles must be slate, concrete or fiberglass shakes or approved clay tiles, or other approved natural materials.
    2. Fiberglass roof tiles must be pre-approved by the DRC as to color, form and structural value.
    3. Flat roof areas must be covered with matching surrounding roof color. Submit with color board.
    4. 'S' tiles are prohibited.
    5. Limited use of zinc or galvanized finish (non-painted) roofs may be allowed, subject to review by the DRC
    6. White and blue color roofs shall not be approved or permitted.
    7. Crushed rock or other rock, asphalt shingles, and asbestos or other composition roofs are not permitted.

    4.7.4.4 Roof Appurtenances

    Roof appurtenances should be integral parts of the architecture of the building. Clerestories, dormers and skylights create interest and add interior light, but they should also integrate with the overall exterior design. Placement on the roof is crucial in creating a pleasant effect.


    Dormers generally should be gable, shed, hip or derivative types. Non functional roof ornamentation should be avoided.


    Diverters, gutters, downspouts and similar accessories, if used, should be designed within the total roofscape. Mechanical, electrical and roof access equipment, vents and antenna should be integrated into the roof or dormer design and not be visible from public views. Ridge ventilators are acceptable. Skylights, solar collectors and clerestories should be designed as masses at angles relating to the primary roof, not as applied forms.


    4.7.5 Gutters

    Gutters and downspouts are required on street frontages and must be designed as continuous architectural features. Copper gutters and downspouts are encouraged. All downspouts must be connected to the storm drain system wherever possible.


    4.7.6 Chimneys and Chimney Caps

    No chimney may extend above the roof or roof line higher than the maximum height as required by the Uniform Building Code adopted by the County. The exterior dimensions of chimneys should be minimized as much as possible to avoid unreasonable obstruction of view or line of sight from other lots. All chimneys shall be enclosed in a material identical to or similar to the building cladding or finished with stone or other approved architectural treatment.


    In general chimneys of masonry stone and stucco are encouraged. Chimney materials should be similar to major exterior finish materials used on the home. Back draft and spark arrestors must be included in chimney designs.


    All chimney terminations shall be capped and shall screen view to flues from all angles especially view from above.


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    4.7.7 Skylights

    Skylights may be designed as an integral part of the roof. Skylight glazing must be clear, tinted or white. Reflective glazing is prohibited. Skylight framing and flashing material must be anodized bronze or colored to match the roof. Unfinished natural aluminum framing and flashing is prohibited.


    4.7.8 Flashing and Sheet Metal

    All flashing and sheet metal must either be copper or must be colored to match adjacent material.


    4.7.9 Vents

    All vent stacks and pipes must be colored to match the adjacent roof or wall material. Vent stacks should be grouped on the side or rear of the roofs. Vents should not extend above the roof ridgeline.


    Venting stacks, flues and other similar projections should be concealed or integrated within the roof form and or color.


    4.7.10 Antennae

    Roof mounted equipment must be concealed. Satellite dishes and mechanical equipment must be planned as part of the roof so they are concealed from all pedestrian viewpoints and any overlooking development.


    No television or radio poles, flag poles, clotheslines, or other external projections other than those originally installed by the developer or approved by the DRC and any replacements of similar type, size and construction, shall be constructed, erected or maintained on any lot or structure in the project. No wiring, insulation, air conditioning, or other machinery or equipment other than that originally installed by Declarant or approved by the DRC and their replacements shall be constructed, erected or maintained on any Lot or structure in the Project. Each owner shall have the right to maintain television or radio antennae within completely enclosed portions of his or her house. No owner shall operate an electronic or radio transmitter or sending device, short-wave radio, CB radio, or "ham radio" which interferes with television or radio reception to surrounding properties. No appliances or installations on exterior roofs of structures shall be permitted without DRC approval, including without limitation, roof top turbine ventilators, unless the same are installed in such a manner that they are not visible from the streets or neighboring Lots.


    4.7.11 Solar

    Building masses and surfaces should be planned to allow solar access and minimize interference with natural sun patterns. Designs should consider:

    1. Shadows cast by buildings, land features and landscaping.
    2. Reflectivity of material color and surfaces.
    3. Large paved areas capable of absorbing the sun's radiation and creating undesirable "hot spots" during the summer.
    4. Direction of cooling breezes.
    5. Landscaped and grassy areas reflecting the sun's radiation, capable of moderating climatic effects.

    No Owner shall install any solar heating panels or other solar energy equipment without the prior written approval of the DRC, which shall have the right to approve or disapprove the size, shape, color, materials, construction or location of such panels.


    4.7.12 Fire Sprinklers

    All residential and commercial structures within the Deer Crest Project shall be internal fire-sprinkler in accordance with the provisions of the Uniform Fire Code, as updated from time to time. Unless specifically approved by the Fire Marshall for non-combustibility, all such structures shall contain exterior sprinklers as well. Such exterior sprinklers shall include at least under eave sprinklers, but may be required to include roof top sprinkling in areas or on structures deemed by the Fire Marshall to have wildfire hazard or vegetation to roof relationships justifying such measures.


    4.7.13 Fences and Walls Above Grade

    Walls and fencing shall be constructed only within the limits of disturbance area. The total length of wall and fence shall not exceed thirty percent (30%) of the perimeter of the limits of disturbance area, except with the approval of the DRC.


    4.7.13.1 Fencing and Wall Height and Distance from Structures

    Fencing and walls may not exceed six (6) feet in height. All fencing heights are measured vertically from the average finished grade at the base of the fence or wall. Fencing must fall within 15 feet of the "dwelling coverage" area (Section 4.1.5) and within 10 feet of the pool surface. Any pool deck is considered a part of the 10-foot limit.


    4.7.13.2 Fencing and Wall Material

    Fencing and walls must be of wood, or masonry finish, or tubular steel.


    All other wall and fencing materials are prohibited. Gates should be tubular steel. Wood gates will be permitted if approved by the DRC. Gates are prohibited at utility easements or protected open space areas.


    4.7.13.3 Fencing, Walls and Hedges in Setback Areas

    All Front setbacks are to remain open and unwalled or unfenced except as may be approved by the DRC.


    There is no perimeter fencing allowed in Deer Crest. All fencing must fall within the limits established in Section 4.7.13.


    No hedge, hedgerow, wall or fence or other structure shall be planted, erected, located or maintained along the side or rear setback property line of any lot which interferes with any drainage easement or which is higher than six feet above the finished grade at the lot line (unless exception is allowed by the DRC).


    All other fencing shall be reviewed and approved in advance by the DRC.


    4.7.14 Surface Drainage

    All retaining wails must be properly waterproofed and drained. Sheet flow, roof water, and overflow irrigation water must be drained. All bench and vertical drains must be stained or colored so as to blend in with the surrounding landscape and/or buildings as determined by the DRC.


    4.7.15 Mailboxes

    Mailboxes shall be as specified by the DCMA, provided by the lot owner, and maintained by the lot owner. Address numbers shall be incorporated into the design.


    4.7.16 Gas and Electric Meters

    Gas and electric meters are to be located in enclosed cabinets, within recesses or behind screen walls which are part of the architecture and which are in conformance with utility company standards. Utility meters must be located in the side setbacks of homes and must be hidden from view. Landscape screens may be acceptable if approved by the DRC. Any gas or electrical meters that are required by the utility companies to be accessible by road will be required to be faux painted to be to match surrounding area.


    4.7.17 Trash Containers

    Adequate space for garbage storage and recycling must be provided and must meet the requirements of the Wasatch County Solid Waste Disposal Special Service District. Garbage storage must be enclosed.


    4.7.18 Mechanical Equipment

    All air conditioning, heating equipment and soft water tanks must be screened from view and be insulated for sound attenuation. Air conditioning units are not permitted on roofs or in windows.


    4.7.19 Appurtenant Structures

    All patio structures, balconies trellises, sun shades, gazebos, mechanical equipment structures, decking and other auxiliary structures are to be designed in the character of and must be integral to the home architecture and must be approved by the DRC.


    Trellises:

    Gazebos:


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    5.0 CONDOMINIUM PARCELS

    5.1 Site Development Guidelines

    5.1.1 Impervious Surfaces

    All paved surfaces should be of scale and character suitable to the surrounding environment, responding to climate, terrain, and the palette of natural materials and colors existing on the site. Aesthetic and functional considerations should be employed in the choice of materials for paved areas.


    Any plaza areas should be linked to adjacent open spaces and land uses to allow pedestrian access. Common roads and driveways may be asphalt. Upgraded materials and special design features are required to be used in the formal areas of the project.


    Acceptable upgraded materials may include but are not limited to:

    Unacceptable paving materials include:


    It is very important that materials designated for use in plaza areas and major pedestrian walks be selected with regard to durability, maintenance, stability, and aesthetic appearance. It is also important that the selected paving material be applied consistently and uniformly to all pedestrian areas to enhance the overall design theme and continuity of the development and avoid a piecemeal approach which would result in a multiplicity of materials, surfaces and wear quality.


    5.1.2 Gates and Entrances

    Driveway design may include entrance gates with the joint approval of the DRC and Wasatch County. The following guidelines are suggested for the construction of entrance gates:

    1. Gates may not exceed six (6) feet in height and twelve (12) feet in length on each side to road centerline or twenty-four (24) feet wide maximum.
    2. Gate operator mechanisms shall conform with Fire Department regulations.
    3. Gates shall be set back twenty-five (25) feet from property lines.
    4. Acceptable gate construction materials include native stone, timber, and ornamental iron.
    5. Minimal lighting of the project name and/or address will be used to enhance the design.
    6. No sentry or barrier gates (gates with mechanical arms) will be allowed except in parking lots or storage areas.
    7. Natural aluminum, chain link or other reflective fencing materials are not permitted.
    5.1.3 Walls and Fences Above Grade and Retaining Walls

    Walls and fences may be employed to provide privacy screen service areas. Retaining walls may be used to control erosion or access across steeper property. Fencing property around boundary lines is not permitted. The placement of walls and fences should respect existing land forms and pedestrian access, follow existing contours, be sensitive to site vegetation and integrate with existing or proposed structural massing. Fence and wall designs should be harmonized with the site and the buildings in both scale and appearance.


    No walls, fences or combinations thereof, whether adjacent to building or separated from them, may exceed six (6) feet in height above finished grade. All designs for walls and fences to screen service areas or provide privacy must be reviewed by the DRC.


    The exposed surface of retaining walls may exceed six (6) feet in height with DRC approval for difficult accesses to steep sloping sites. The maximum height of s single retaining wall is fifteen (15) feet from finished grade to top of wall. At any allowable height, multiple walls may be stepped up a slope at a minimum horizontal spacing of six (6) feet from front top of upper wall to front top of lower wall. All retaining walls must be engineered and must be within the setback limits of a parcel or lot. Walls required for special site conditions may be approved by the DRC.


    Acceptable materials for exposed walls above grade include:

    Acceptable materials for fencing include:

    Unacceptable fencing materials include:

    5.1.4 Signage

    A coordinated and united signage system is proposed for Deer Crest to provide both graphic and visual continuity. Signage design standards will be coordinated and established by the DRC based on these Design Guidelines.


    A well-coordinated system of directional and informational signage is necessary within large-scale projects such as Deer Crest to clarify and provide information to visitors and residents and to reinforce the community's continuity and harmony. Signs perform three primary functions:

    1. They identify place and accessibility
    2. They indicate danger and provide warning or cautionary data
    3. They provide information concerning location, routing and traffic flow

    Information on signs should be clear and concise, and signs should be located in obvious areas to assure visibility. Lettering styles should be uniform and bold yet simple. Color schemes with contrasting colors, especially light colors on dark backgrounds, are the most readable and noticeable from longer distances. The sign system should also include a graphic or logo to reinforce the Deer Crest identity and image.


    Whenever possible, signs should be organized into unified systems, combined with lighting fixtures and kiosks or located in highly visible, well-lighted areas. Informational signs should be located in areas where people gather, change direction or change mode of travel. They should be placed where they can be incorporated with the design of other site elements and where they allow safe pedestrian clearance and are not in conflict with door openings or vehicular and equipment operation. Where critical routing is necessary, directional information and arrows should be provided to aid people in traveling quickly and easily to their destinations. Signs that give direction to handicapped access points and facilities should be utilized. The success of a comprehensive signage program for Deer Crest is dependent upon a uniform and consistent application of established design standards with all types of signs, whether incidental or informational.


    It is important to ensure that the requirements for signage are met with efficient, functional signs that are aesthetically pleasing and durable. Sign failure can result from poor workmanship, improper materials, inadequate maintenance, and/or misunderstanding as to the environmental conditions anticipated and performance standards expected. To ensure that signage systems meet expectations, the following standards should be considered:

    1. Sign materials should be such that they can withstand weather conditions and be generally damage proof
    2. Signing systems should require minimum painting and be rust and pit proof
    3. Color should be fade resistant
    4. Signage systems should be vandal proof
    5. Signs should be equipped with break-away supports for safety and ease of repair and maintenance
    6. Signs should be fireproof or fire retardant
    7. Signs included in the system to meet state and federal requirements should be reflective but free from annoying glare
    8. Support and anchoring devices for signage systems should accommodate and/or exceed building code standards and state requirements
    9. If signage material is aluminum, all materials and applications should be in accordance with established procedures and standards
    10. Refer to Appendix "L" for Sales Signage Guidelines
    11. Refer to Appendix "M" for Construction Signage Guidelines

    Information on signs should be clear and concise, and signs should be located in obvious areas to assure visibility. Lettering styles should be uniform and bold yet simple. Color schemes with contrasting colors, especially light colors on dark backgrounds, are the most readable and noticeable from longer distances. The sign system should also include a graphic or logo to reinforce the Deer Crest identity and image.


    Whenever possible, signs should be organized into unified systems, combined with lighting fixtures and kiosks or located in highly visible, well-lighted areas. Informational signs should be located in areas where people gather, change direction or change mode of travel. They should be placed where they can be incorporated with the design of other site elements and where they allow safe pedestrian clearance and are not in conflict with door openings or vehicular and equipment operation. Where critical routing is necessary, directional information and arrows should be provided to aid people in traveling quickly and easily to their destinations.


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    5.1.4.1 Sign Categories and Sizes

    Categories of signs and size of signs are addressed for better clarification:

    1. Temporary Directional signs consist of open house signs, Home tour signs, and homeowner events. These signs will only be allowed within the gates and can not exceed 2' wide x 3' tall. They must be commercially produced and must be removed immediately after the designated event.
    2. Lot or Sale Signs consist of signs for identifying Lots or Homes for Sale. They are 48" wide x 40" tall. The template for this sign has a dark green background with the Deer Crest logo and the address location. Below this can be all other pertinent information, such as Architect, Builder, Realtor, Owner and any other contact information. These signs may be purchased through Park City Sign. A frame will be provided by the Association. If the frame is not returned in an acceptable condition, then a $400 fee will be assessed to the Lot Owner.
    3. Home address signs are for easy identification of homes for emergency vehicles, guests and snow removal. This sign can be pilaster, large stone or ornamental statue. It is required to be lit at night with 4" x 8" identifying numbers and be visible at all times. It will be built out of material complementary to the home. It will need to be located at the front of the driveway and be at least 3' from the curb and at least 3' tall to allow for snow accumulation and still remain visible.
    5.1.5 Lighting

    All exterior lighting design is subject to approval by the DRC.


    Factors to be considered are:

    Parking lot and private driveway lighting should meet Wasatch County/Park City and Utah Department of Transportation standards where applicable, be a complementary style, and be in character with the overall theme and image established for Deer Crest. In all cases lighting should be designed to minimize or eliminate light pollution and overthrow of light onto adjacent properties. All exterior lighting is to be indirect and shielded to prevent spillover onto adjacent lots and the street. Exposed bright lamps and spot lights are prohibited. No flood lighting will be allowed in open space areas or on vacant property. Detailed lighting plans must be prepared for review and approval by the DRC. Plans should show lighting location, intensities, heights, fixture design and light sources.


    5.1.6 Landscape Structures and Site Furnishings

    The development of outdoor spaces and landscaping often includes structures and site furnishings (decks, gazebos, benches, playground equipment, drinking fountains, trash receptacles, kiosks). These elements should be designed as extensions of the architecture and the spaces rather than as separate items. Additionally, landscape structures and site furnishings should conform to the common site character established for the development. These are among the elements of Deer Crest which serve to reinforce design character, facilitate pedestrian and skier use, and enliven the outdoor spaces. These general objectives should guide design decisions relative to site elements:

    1. Components should be functional in form, related in design, simple in fabrication and standardized in appearance.
    2. A limited vocabulary of materials should be selected for proven durability and ease of maintenance.
    3. Elements of similar function should be clustered in units or groupings.
    4. Location and placement of furnishings should logically respond to patterns, types and intensity of usage.
    5. Components should be located to optimize public safety and not restrict emergency vehicle access.
    6. Furnishing design and placement should not obstruct efficient surface maintenance and cleaning operations.
    7. Maximum serviceability and coordination must be maintained for all utilities.
    8. Site elements should allow "barrier free" access by all people including the elderly and physically challenged.
    5.1.7 Site Planning

    Site planning should make use of relevant consultants-architects, civil engineers, soils engineers, landscape architects, geologists and other specialists-as required. It should draw upon topographic and vegetation surveys, site photographs, soils reports, site visits and any other documentation helpful in forming an accurate picture of the site's condition.


    Vegetation removal for any given property should be minimized and must be coordinated with the DRC.


    5.1.8 Site Drainage

    An engineered site drainage plan is required to be developed that ties into the overall Deer Crest storm drainage system and meets the requirements of Wasatch County.


    Refer to 5.1.13 for driveway drainage requirements


    5.1.9 Limits of Disturbance

    A limit of Disturbance (LOD) fencing is to be installed before construction starts and maintained throughout the construction phase. This marking system will consist of "T" stakes, enough to support a brightly colored rope line on both sides of the lot from the edge of the road shoulder to the ski trail to identify the side edges. In areas that the brightly colored rope is not visible, brightly colored ribbon may be used as a visual aid to help distinguish the boundary line. The LOD must fall within the property boundary, but may be outside the building envelope, if necessary. The side yard limits of disturbance will typically project to the property line at the front of the property, thereby allowing use of the front yard area for construction access and staging. However, front yard limits may be imposed at the discretion of the DRC and Wasatch County or Park City on a case by case basis. The placement of seasonal ski fence adjacent to Ski runs and Trails will be required and governed by DCMA. Additional LOD fencing may also be required at the discretion of the DCMA where temporary construction access to a lot may be allowed from areas other than the front yard or fencing may be required to maintain construction debris. At least 40% of disturbed areas outside of the dwelling coverage must be revegetated with trees and shrubs pursuant to Section 4.4.4.2 below.


    5.1.10 View Corridors

    In developing the site and building designs, with regard to views, the following must be considered:

    Unsightly views such as unmitigated hillside scarring, exposed maintenance or service areas will not be allowed.


    5.1.11 Site Grading Requirements

    All demolition, clearing, grubbing, stripping of soil, excavation, compaction, and grading must be completed within the owner's property area. Existing vegetation and landscaped areas must be protected during all construction operations through the use of approved fencing or other barriers. Open slope landscaping and roadways damaged by any construction of any property owner may be replaced, at the sole option of DCMA, by the DCMA, at the lot owner's expense.


    5.1.12 Erosion Control

    To prevent erosion and maintain the essential quality of the site, the following construction practices are expected:

    1. Strict adherence to the set limits of disturbance including stockpiling, equipment parking, and traffic to be confined therein;
    2. Trees within the construction zone that are to be preserved must be fenced off to protect them from injury or removed for relocation. Where tree sizes and slopes permit, they must be stockpiled in accordance with established nursery practices for relocation on the site following construction.
    3. Cuts and fills, when required for construction of roads, driveways and pathways, should conform to accepted engineering practices with naturally rounded tops and toes of slopes. Revegetation is required on all cut and fill slopes.
    4. During and after construction, the following erosion control practices must be implemented:
      1. During Construction:
        1. Temporary stockpiles of topsoil must be stabilized either by mulching or covering.
        2. Temporary runoff channels must be built to drain construction zones; in areas draining two acres or less, channels must have silt screens installed at appropriate locations; silt screens should consist of plastic fabric stretched across and anchored to the bottom of the channels with hay bales placed on the upstream side of the fabric; where watershed above the site exceeds two acres, temporary earthen berms must be used in lieu of silt screens.
        3. All storm drain inlet structures must be protected by a filter berm until the area is stabilized with vegetation or the base course of pavement is installed.
      2. After Construction:
        1. All embankments constructed as part of cut/fill operations will be seeded and mulched as soon as final grading has been completed.
        2. All building site areas must be seeded and mulched as soon as final grading has been completed.

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    5.1.13 Driveways

    Heated driveways are encouraged and driveway slopes should not exceed 10% at any point. If site conditions require that any point along a driveway exceeds 10% then a snow melt system is recommended. Changes in the grade along the length of the driveway must be designed in accordance with recognized civil engineering road design standards and this information must be clearly indicated on the driveway design plans. Abrupt changes in grade are not acceptable.


    Driveways sloping down to street from the building must include drainage structures to control run-off rates and channel the water to culverts to prevent water from running out into the street. Two alternative approaches are:

    1. Provide cross slope on driveways to direct water to one side where a rock lined culvert of at least 24" width can collect and slow the water. This culvert would be flared to 6' in width as it flows into the existing street culvert and must direct water down the culvert instead of onto the street and/or provide a catch basin with appropriate slopes to catch water above the street. This catch basin must be sized and configured to collect the water draining down the driveway and then direct it in pipes to a daylight opening near the street culvert or a direct connection into existing storm drain system.

    Driveways sloping down to property from streets must include drainage systems to divert water around the building that is lower than the street without allowing it to pond or drain into garages, entrances or window wells.


    5.1.14 Landscaping

    5.1.14.1 Design

    The developer is required to retain a licensed landscape architect to design the landscaping and sprinkler plan to ensure a comprehensive planting plan and efficient water management.


    5.1.14.2 Revegetation

    To the greatest extent possible, revegetation should recreate the earlier character of the site using indigenous shrubs and trees, preferably relocated from areas disturbed by construction if possible.


    5.1.14.3 New Plantings

    A detailed landscape plan is required to be submitted to the DRC as part of the design review process.


    Plant materials should be selected for structure, texture, color, ultimate size, hardiness, fire resistance and drought tolerance.


    Ornamental plantings should only occur at entrances, plazas, courtyard and in planters adjacent to buildings to add variety and interest to the pedestrian areas and to emphasize the importance of an area. Landscaped areas should be planned as an integral part of the project development and not simply located in left-over space. No plant material should be located in drip lines under building eaves.


    5.1.15 Snow Management

    A snow management plan shall be submitted with the preliminary plans for all commercial parcels. Snow management and storage for driveways, service and parking areas must be planned for and indicated on the site plan for review by the DRC.


    The effects of snow and ice build-up, if improperly handled, can be destructive to building, pose risks to pedestrians and vehicles, and impose high ongoing snow removal and maintenance costs. The heavy snows and extreme freeze/thaw cycle of Deer Crest combine to make snow management an important design consideration. Architects and designers not thoroughly familiar with snow country design should retain a consultant early in the design process.

    1. The basic building form must be conducive to snow management.
    2. Snow and drainage from roofs may not be dumped onto adjoining streets or properties.
    3. Snow accumulation shall be managed on an ongoing basis.
    4. Snow must be shed with control or retained. Snow diverters and snow retainers must be designed as an integral part of the roofscape.
    5. Entrances and pedestrian routes must be fully protected from snow sheds and icicles. Shedding snow must be deflected from pedestrian areas by dormers, angled roofs, canopies or other means.
    6. Deicing salts are prohibited due to the damage caused to roads and structures.
    7. Snow dump areas must not be accessible to pedestrians.
    8. Building projections shall be durable.
    9. Roofs dumping snow onto a series of lower roofs or onto a lower roof from great height must be prohibited because shedding snow can cause extreme snow loads or impact loads respectively.
    10. Balconies shall not be planned such that they are subject to dangerous amounts of shedding snow.

    5.2 Building Design Guidelines

    5.2.1 Building Envelope

    The building envelope will be established by the minimum required setbacks as established by the recorded subdivision plat and as per the Wasatch County land use plan. No supported decks or structures will be allowed to encroach into setbacks or beyond the edge of the building envelope. Only unsupported roof overhangs may encroach on the setbacks. These conditions will be reviewed by the DRC on a case by case basis.


    Setback Requirements Minimum Setbacks: Front Lot Line: 15 feet; Rear Lot Line: 25 feet; Side Lot Line: 10 feet; Distance from Road Centerline: 40 feet.


    5.2.2 Building Character and Scale

    Building height shall be limited as described in the First Amended Density Determination (page 127, section E) and the Wasatch County procedure of measuring building height shall be applied.

    Building designs will be reviewed prior to approval by the DRC. Massing must be stepped back or otherwise respond appropriately to pedestrian scale and adjacent projects where view corridors must be considered. Proposed variations from this guideline are subject to review and may be approved by the DRC without obligation to any other parcel or owner in the project.


    Facade design shall display a finished appearance on all sides of the building. The building faces are envisioned as a rich collection of varied yet harmonious facades, adding interest, scale and rhythm to the project. Building facades must include varied architectural features including bay windows, balconies, dormers and facade detailing as textural elements which strengthen the scale of the building and resort images. Building facades shall give a substantial appearance, and openings shall display a "punched" appearance. Curtain walls or facades incorporating long horizontal strip windows are not permitted. Covered decks, balconies and porches are strongly encouraged as they provide unable outdoor space and add life and interest to the street.


    To the extent possible, buildings in the development should conform to the following criteria in order to attain architectural forms visually related to the shapes of the mountains and to achieve strong architectural ties to the landscape.


    Buildings shall step from level to level as possible. Unbroken vertical elevations shall be avoided; and elevations designed to emphasize horizontal lines by use of stepped levels and/or balconies and decks are encouraged.


    The building pad will be established by the minimum required setbacks as established by the recorded subdivision plat and as per the Wasatch County or Park City land use plan as applicable. No supported decks or structures will be allowed to encroach into setbacks or beyond the edge of the building envelope. Unsupported roof overhangs may encroach on the setbacks with specific DRC approval. These conditions will be reviewed by the DRC on a case by case basis.


    5.2.3 Parking

    Vehicular parking, both covered and uncovered shall be provided according to the requirements of the First Amended Density Determination (page 43 & 44).


    5.2.4 Building Materials

    Exterior Walls & Surface Materials

    Lower wall surfaces should be built of or finished with a hard surface durable material for wall protection from climatic conditions and to provide an aesthetic base to the architecture. The following materials are allowed:

    Upper wall surfaces should be of durable material that creates a rural sense of scale and warmth. Recommended materials include:

    Walls should be limited to a maximum of three different materials from the above list. Those three materials will be subject to review for compatibility and approval by the DRC.


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    5.2.5 Wall Openings

    Window and door openings should be recessed on all elevations to accentuate the appearance of wall depth. Us of wood windows is highly encouraged. Window and door frames shall be constructed of wood, PVC coated wood frames, or anodized aluminum. Window and door frames of natural aluminum finish and highly reflective glazing material or bright color are prohibited. Glass tinting or shading must be compatible with the general color and style of the home and is subject to review and approval by the DRC. Mirrored glass, reflective glass film and plastic roll-up shades shall not be permitted. Exterior shades or awnings of any type shall not be permitted. Windows cannot be painted or covered by foil, cardboard, sheets or other similar material.


    5.2.6 Wall Appurtenances

    Wall decorations, shutters, bay windows, flower boxes, balconies and other wall appurtenances should be simple, functional and well integrated with the total design.


    5.2.7 Roofs

    Roof form shall be modulated. Roof form shall be broken up with the use of dormers, or other architectural features. The ridgeline should not be continuous but should be varied in height or broken with chimneys, cupolas, towers or other features.


    Horizontal relief:

    Eave lines, a major cornice/trim line, or other significant horizontal relief shall be located below the third story to bring the building down to a pedestrian scale. Consider coordination with adjoining eaves, peaks, gables and slopes. Exposed party walls are not acceptable.


    Roof snow handling characteristics:

    Snow splitters must be substantial, and fitted to all projections on sloped roofs that are not located close to the roof ridge (e.g. chimneys, vents, skylight, etc.).


    Generally, conventional eaves troughs or built-in eaves troughs should be avoided as they are subject to damage from snowshed.


    Roof design shall consider the effect of slope, materials, construction, projections and slope/flat roof distribution on snow shedding characteristics.


    Roof design shall conform to the snow management plan. Roofs shall be designed to withstand the extreme freeze/thaw cycle at Deer Crest and its impact on snow shed, snow retention, roof drip, icicle management, ice dams, and water infiltration.


    5.2.8 Roof Shape and Ridge Alignment

    A single roof shape should dominate building masses to provide harmony. Roof ridge alignments should enhance the visual impact of the primary structure and other buildings on the site.


    The following roof shapes are encouraged:

    Large areas of subordinate flat roofs are not acceptable. A composition of sloped roofs is required in each project with small areas of flat roofs acceptable in multifamily/commercial areas. Roofs of connected and adjacent building must be fully coordinated.


    Not permitted are:

    5.2.9 Roof Slope

    The slope range considered acceptable for building in Deer Crest is between 4:12 and 10:12. Lesser slopes will be discouraged. Roofs should truncate above the ground and roofs on both sides of a ridge should be the same slope, but not necessarily the same length. Roof overhangs should be encouraged as extensions to protect walls, to protect and cover pedestrian traffic below, and to direct water shedding to desired locations.


    5.2.10 Roof Surfacing Material

    All roofing materials must be approved by the DRC.


    Roofing materials shall be selected so as to be functional and durable considering the effects of climate and snow. The color of roof materials must be generally neutral or muted in order to blend with or enhance the colors of the natural landscape. All roof flashing materials shall be pre-finished metal to match roof color. Consider the color of neighboring roofs to create a complementary roof palette; avoid selective strongly contracting colors. Fascia sections and eave lines should have substantial appearance.


    5.2.11 Roof Appurtenances

    Roof appurtenances should be integral parts of the architecture of the building. Dormers generally should be gable, shed, hip or derivative types and non-functional roof ornamentation should be avoided. Ridge ventilators are acceptable. Skylights, solar collectors and clerestories should be designed as masses at angles relating to the primary roof, not as applied forms.


    Diverters, gutters, downspouts and similar accessories, if used, should be designed within the total roofscape. Mechanical, electrical and roof access equipment, vents and antenna should be integrated into the roof or dormer design and not be visible from public views.


    5.2.12 Gutters

    Where gutters and downspouts are required they must be designed as continuous architectural features. Copper gutters and downspouts are encouraged. All downspouts must be connected to the storm drain system wherever possible.


    5.2.13 Chimneys and Chimney Caps

    No chimney may extend above the roof or roof line higher than the maximum height as required by the current Building Code adopted by Wasatch County. All chimneys shall be enclosed in a material identical or similar to the building cladding or finished with stone or other approved architectural treatment. In general chimneys of stone masonry are encouraged. Spark arrestors must be included in chimney designs. All chimney terminations shall be capped and shall screen view to flues from all angles, and as viewed from above.


    5.2.14 Flashing and Sheet Metal

    All flashing and sheet metal must either be copper or must be colored to match adjacent material.


    5.2.15 Vents

    Vent stacks should be grouped, screened from the view of adjacent buildings, and as viewed from above.


    5.2.16 Antennae

    Roof mounted equipment must be concealed. Satellite dishes and mechanical equipment must be planned as part of the roof so they are concealed from all pedestrian viewpoints and any overlooking development.


    5.2.17 Fire Sprinklers

    All residential and commercial structures within the Deer Crest project shall be internal fire-sprinkler in accordance with the provisions of the Uniform Fire Code, as updated from time to time. Unless specifically approved by the Fire Marshal for non-combustibility, all such structures shall contain exterior sprinklers as well. Such exterior sprinklers shall include at least under eave sprinklers but may be required to include roof top sprinkling in areas or on structures deemed by the Fire Marshal to have wildfire hazard or vegetation to roof relationships justifying such measures.


    5.2.18 Gas and Electric Meters

    Gas and electric meters are to be located in enclosed cabinets, within recessed or behind screen walls which are part of the architecture and which are in conformance with utility company standards. Utility meters must be located in the side setbacks of homes and must be hidden from view. Landscape screens may be acceptable if approved by the DRC. Any gas or electrical meters that are required by the utility companies to be accessible by road will be required to be faux painted to match surrounding area.


    5.2.19 Trash Containers

    Adequate space for garbage storage and recycling must be provided and must meet the requirements of the Wasatch County Solid Waste Disposal Special Service District. Garbage storage must be enclosed.


    5.2.20 Mechanical Equipment

    All air conditioning, heating equipment and soft water tanks must be screened from view and be insulated for sound attenuation. Air conditioning units are not permitted on roofs or in windows.


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    5.3 Design Approval Process

    5.3.1 Approving Bodies

    The primary entity for approval of any improvements, construction or landscaping, or alterations thereof, within Deer Crest is the Deer Crest Design Review Committee. Wasatch County or Park City will also review all construction documents previously approved by DRC as applicable. Design, drawings or specifications may not be submitted to Wasatch County or Park City without first having been stamped "Approved by DRC" and dated.


    In addition to obtaining all necessary approvals from the DRC as set forth in the CC&Rs and these Design Guidelines, each property owner is obligated to obtain all necessary jurisdictional governmental approvals and to prepare plans and specifications in accordance with all applicable governmental laws and regulations affecting the use of the property and the improvements constructed thereon.


    Approval of any proposed or existing improvement by the DRC shall not be construed to warrant or represent that the improvement was approved by or complies with the appropriate standards of any public agency that has jurisdiction over such improvement. Similarly, approval of any proposed or existing improvement by any public agency having jurisdiction over the improvement shall not constitute approval by the DRC.


    The DRC shall not be responsible for reviewing and/or approving any plans and specifications for engineering design, structural engineering and safety, or for compliance with applicable zoning, building or other county, state or federal laws, ordinances or policies.


    All submittals to the DRC for review and approval should be made at the following address:


    Deer Crest Master Association DRC
    3672 Deer Crests Estates Drive
    Park City, UT 84060
    Phone: (435) 655-8215

    The Deer Crest Master Association may, from time to time, change the address for the submittal of plans and specification.


    5.3.2 The Process
    1. Engage a licensed land surveyor and/or landscape architect to conduct a site survey of the vegetation, topography at two (2) foot contour intervals and other natural site features and prepare an existing conditions map at a minimum scale of 1" = 20'. Members of the DRC will conduct a site visit to review and approve the existing conditions mapping in the field.
    2. Engage consultants (planner, engineer, architect) to prepare:
      1. A preliminary site plan showing building footprint and other impervious elements at a minimum scale of 1" = 20".
      2. A grading, drainage, erosion control plan at a scale of 1" = 20'.
        1. All lot grading plans must be prepared by an architect and civil engineer and in accordance with all applicable Planning/Building Department requirements. All necessary bonds and/or deposits required by the DCMA and/or Wasatch County or Park City must be paid prior to commencing any grading work on the lot. The owner will also provide a report from a qualified soils engineer giving soil and geology clearance.
          1. Existing and proposed contours with a two (2) foot contour interval minimum;
          2. Finished pad elevations;
          3. Slopes with elevations of top and bottom of slope;
          4. Surface and subsurface drainage provisions with tope of grade and invert elevations, retaining walls with elevations at the top and bottom of wall, and locations and mountings for site improvements such as planters, accessory building, and walls.
        2. Grading plans must include the following information:
        3. Surface drainage of paved areas must be sloped at accepted engineering standards. Surface drainage of landscape areas and planted swales must be sloped to drain.
        4. Lots unable to meet the minimum surface drainage requirements must use a subsurface drainage system with drain inlets at adequate intervals
        5. All drains must use approved inlets with appropriate grates. The minimum slope for the drains is one percent (1%). All above ground drainage devices must be colored to match the existing soil, landscape or hardscape color.
    3. Submit this Initial Preliminary Plan Package (items 1 and 2 above) to the DRC for the first review, comments and requested revisions or additional information requirements.
    4. The Initial Preliminary Plan Package must include the application provided by the DRC with the following current information:
      1. Property owner's name
      2. Mailing address
      3. Business and resident telephone numbers including area code
      4. Lot or parcel number (site of proposed construction)
      5. Address of property
      6. Name, address and telephone number of the property owner's representative and/or consultants (architect, land planner, engineer, surveyor)
      7. List of drawings included
      8. Design Review and DCMA Security Deposit Fees
    5. A preliminary meeting shall be held at the property with the DRC and Owner's Architect during DRCs preliminary plan review. The corners of the building shall be staked and be provided with height indicators if requested by the DRC. DRC will review view corridors, height restrictions and site related concerns of the subject property at this meeting.

    When all documentation has been submitted and any revisions or additional requirements to the initial preliminary plan package required by the DRC are complete, the property owner will submit a Revised Preliminary Plan Package to the DRC. The DRC will conduct a final plan review and prepare a written approval of the Preliminary Plan Package.


    The DRC will have up to thirty (30) days to either approve or disapprove the proposed improvements as presented in the Preliminary Plan Package. Failure by the DRC to act within this thirty-day period shall constitute denial of the request set forth in the submittal. In the event of such denial through non-action by the DRC, the property owner may make formal written request for notification of the status of his submittal. This formal request constitutes a re-submittal of the Preliminary Plan Package. Failure by the DRC to act on this re-submittal within thirty calendar days will constitute approval of the submittal.


    Should the DRC disapprove a Preliminary Plan Package submittal, the property owner may have the right to appeal the decision to the DCMA pursuant to the Deer Crest CC&Rs.


    Once the property owner has the DRCs stamped approval, he may then authorize his consultants to begin preparation of construction documents. The Construction Documents Package must contain all of the documentation in the preliminary plan package together with complete construction drawings, landscape and irrigation plans, written specifications and material sample board.


    The Construction Documents Package shall be submitted to the DRC for review, comments, and final approval. The DRC shall again have up to thirty days to review and approve or disapprove the Construction Documents Package using the same procedures and in the same manner as the Preliminary Plan Package.


    Once any required DRC revisions and/or additions to the documentation are complete and acceptable, the DRC will issue the approval stamp of the final construction documents package which can then be submitted to Wasatch County for review, comments, approval and issuance of building and grading permits. No submission can be made to Wasatch County or Park City without first obtaining the approval stamp from the DRC.


    When the property owner has obtained a building permit, copies must be provided to the DRC together with copies of the County's comments and additional requirements, if any. The DRC reserves the right to impose additional requirements upon the property owner if the building department's comments deviate from the previously approved plans. The DRC shall indicate any additional requirement arising in conjunction with its review of the building department comments within thirty days of receipt of those comments.


    While you are considering your new home in Deer Crest it would be beneficial for you to get to know your neighbors as soon as possible. You can get their contact information from the HOA and then ask them about the neighborhood. As a common courtesy, once the DRC has had the on site meeting with you and your architect the Construction Coordinator will notify your neighbors that construction is being discussed. We urge you to consider the impact of your home and the landscaping on your neighbor's view corridors during the design process. We also suggest that you offer your neighbors a copy of your landscape plan and rendition of the home so they know what to expect when the home is completed. Listening to concerns they may raise will create a positive neighborhood atmosphere.


    5.3.3 Fees, Deposits and Insurance

    The following fees are to be submitted with the Preliminary Plan Package in order to initiate the design review process.

    1. Design Review Fee - $6,500.00
    2. Construction Coordination Fee - $5,500
    3. Security Deposit - $3,000
    4. $50,000 completion deposit that is fully refundable. Refer to 5.3.3.4
    5. Special assessment for excavation exceeding 2500 cubic yards.
    6. Blasting Monitor Fee (if blasting is required)
    7. Insurance
    8. Remodel Fees

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    5.3.3.1 Design Review Fee

    The $6,500 design review fee covers the cost to review and approve the initial project to submit for building permit.


    5.3.3.2 Construction Coordination Fee

    The Construction Coordination fee covers on site requirements during the building process. Any modification to the design during construction or after construction that requires further DRC design review or construction administrative time will be charged additional fees at an hourly rate. A fee schedule that discloses hourly rates may be obtained from the DRC office.


    5.3.3.3 Security Deposit for single family residence

    The security deposit assures the proper clean-up of dirt and debris and repair of any damage to the landscaping, private streets, and entry gates within Deer Crest caused by the owners or agents in construction occurring on their site. In the event that this deposit is depleted during construction, the property owner must replenish the deposit before construction can continue. The $3,000 deposit shall not limit the liability of the owner to DCMA regarding any repair to any damage caused by the owner or the rights and remedies of DCMA against owner regarding such repair to any damage caused by owner.


    5.3.3.4 Completion Deposit

    Each Owner constructing a home on a single family estate lot is required to submit a Completion Deposit in the amount of Fifty Thousand Dollars ($50,000) to Deer Crest Master Association. The Completion Deposit must be received prior to commencement of any excavation on the Lot. The deposit shall be released to the original payer after completion of all items that have been addressed in the Final Inspection to the satisfaction of the DRC and DCMA. Failure to complete all final inspection items within the time agreed upon by the owner/builder and the DCMA will result in forfeiture of the deposit.


    Any remaining portion of this deposit is to be refunded upon completion of an owner's improvements.


    The security deposit fee may be increased at the discretion of the DCMA or the DRC.


    5.3.3.5 Excessive Excavation fee

    It will be the responsibility of the Owner/General Contractor to provide the estimate for the amount of soil to be removed from the construction area before final design approval. Excavation of more than 2500 cy yards will be charged an excessive excavation fee. This fee will be determined annually by the Board of trustees and will be based in the amount of excess excavation and miles travelled within the Deer Crest Development. The fee is currently $4.95 per truck, per mile. This charge will be based upon the estimate from the builder prior to final design approval and paid to the Deer Crest Master Association. Check must reference the overage excavation charge and lot #.


    5.3.3.6 Blasting Monitoring Fees

    In the event that blasting is required for construction on a development parcel, payment of fees for all monitoring services conducted by Deer Crest's designated blasting consultant are the responsibility of the property owner.


    5.3.3.7 Insurance

    Prior to the commencement of construction, the property owner shall purchase and require the building contractor to purchase liability insurance and shall maintain and cause contractors to maintain such insurance. Certificate(s) of Insurance must be maintained for the entire period of time necessary to construct the owner's improvements or any addition thereto in an amount not less than one million dollars ($1,000,000). Each liability insurance policy shall contain the following clauses:

    1. "This insurance shall not be canceled, limited in scope of coverage, or non-renewed until thirty days written notice has been given to the Deer Crest Master Association."
    2. "This insurance policy, which names the Deer Crest Master Association as an additional insured, is primary and any insurance maintained by such additional insured shall be non-contributing."
    5.3.3.8 Remodel Fees
    1. Incidental:   Exterior work with minimal impact on the home and/or the development or neighbors. This is work that does not require a permit from the local government authorities because it falls in a "Cosmetic" classification of work. You are required to notify the HOA of your project for an understanding of the impact and time frame for completion. The HOA may require a refundable Security Deposit depending on the scope of the project. This would not require any Design Review fee or Construction Coordination fee. All construction rules and regulations are required to be followed or fines may be implemented.
    2. Minor:   Exterior/interior work that will require a building permit from local government entities and would require constant direction for deliveries, work force parking, dust mitigation, noise abatement, garbage control and portable restrooms for workers. This would require a review approval from Design Review and hourly fee at an hourly rate from a Design Review member plus a $1000.00 fee for construction coordination. Also a $3000.00 completion deposit that is fully refundable at the completion and verification of the remodel. All construction rules are required to be followed.
    3. Major:   Full fees to be assessed on remodel with a change in current house footprint. This classification would be handled like any other new construction with the current deposits and fees put in place. All construction rules and regulations are required to be followed.
    5.3.3.9 Completion Date Requirement

    All homes should be completed in 18 months or less from Final Design Approval. Homes that take longer than 18 months to complete will have an additional fee for prolonged building of $500.00 per month. This fee will be drawn from the Security Deposit until home completion. If this deposit is depleted before construction is finished the fee will be drawn from the Construction Deposit until home completion.

    5.4 Construction Rules

    Each owner shall at all times conform and comply with all approved Plans and Specifications for the improvements on his property and otherwise conform and comply in all respects with the Design Guidelines as well as all applicable laws, ordinances, building codes, rules, regulations, orders and the like of Wasatch County or Park City as applicable, or any agency or department thereof and of any other governmental authority, agency or department having jurisdiction.


    The DRC shall have the authority and right at any time and from time to time at any reasonable hour to inspect improvements under construction for the purpose of determining whether the same comply in all respects with the applicable Plans and Specifications as approved by it, but it shall have no duty to make such inspection.


    Prior to construction the DRC shall require the following:

    1. Prior to any construction commencing the Contractor and DRC shall meet at the time for a Pre-Construction meeting.
    2. Copy of applicable governmental permits including Wasatch County Building Permit.
    3. Limits of disturbance must be identified and installed prior to any site work occurring; and the DRC shall inspect the site for compliance with this requirement prior to the property owner's commencement of construction. For LOD details refer to 4.1.5
    4. Evidence, satisfactory to the DRC, from construction lender(s) of sufficiency of funds to proceed with the construction to timely completion, including copies of any completion bonds from Builder(s) as may be required by lender(s). DRC may require said completion bonds to name DCMA as an additional obligee.
    5. Builder shall appear at the Deer Crest office of the DRC when the first disturbance commenced on building site, giving property identification, address and phone numbers where he may be reached at all times (24 hours a day).
    6. Owner shall be held responsibly by DRC for compliance with all DRC rules and regulations.
    7. A final construction/day-labor parking plan and parking area must be approved by the DRC and coordinated by the Construction Coordinator. It may be required for specific lots to have overflow vehicle parking off site to minimize the impact blind corners or restricted roadways.

    During construction the owner shall cause the builder to conform to the following rules and regulations and will be responsible to the DRC for compliance:

    1. Builder shall satisfy all requirements of the Wasatch or Summit County Municipal Code and those requirements of any applicable governmental and/or private agencies for the hook-up of water, sewer, power, gas, telephone and any temporary use of such services.
    2. Access to Deer Crest property must be approved by the General Contractor for a specific lot or a designated person by them. All vehicular construction activity shall enter and exit only from the Jordanelle Gate to/from Highway 40. Entering the property constitutes acceptance of all liabilities set forth in the sign in sheet. For subcontractors working less then two weeks, signing in is sufficient. For subcontractors working more than two weeks, they will be required to have an access card provided by their General Contractor through the Queen Esther Gatehouse.
    3. At any and all times during construction, a representitve of the General Contractor's company will be on-site and available.
    4. No access for workers or construction work may take place before 8:00 a.m. or after 7:00 p.m. No construction work is to be conducted on Sundays or the following holidays: New Years Eve, New Years Day, Presidents Day, Memorial Day, Fourth of July, Labor Day , Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. Interior finish work can be allowed during these restrictions only with written approval by the Deer Crest Master Association (DCMA). Vehicles 1 ton or larger and material deliveries must be scheduled between 8:00 am to 6:00 pm unless prior approval is obtained by DCMA. All loading, unloading and hauling on roadways will conform to required Wasatch County Municipal Codes. These codes will be strictly adhered to and monitored by the lot site superintendent. If any staging takes one third of the road, you will be required to post signage and flaggers during this process. At no time shall less than one full lane be available to traffic, and such traffic shall have priority. If at any time the road is temporarily blocked, the driver must help direct traffic.
    5. At no time will the removal or modification of the following items be allowed: roadways, curbs, shoulders, guardrails, tunnels, bridges, welded wire walls, utilities and landscaping. The home builder will pay for any damage to these items.
    6. The removal, replacement or adding of guardrail for the driveway access must be in strict compliance with Wasatch, Summit County or DCMA and will be the responsibility of the homebuilder.
    7. All noise abatement laws of Wasatch and Summit County or DCMA will be adhered to during construction.
    8. All construction parking must adhere to the parking plan communicated and approved at the "Pre-construction" meeting with the General Contractor. A construction/day-labor parking plan and parking area must be approved by the DRC and coordinated by the Construction Coordinator. It may be required for specific lots to have overflow vehicle parking off site to minimize the impact blind corners or restricted roadways. A limit of vehicles will be determined by construction location. HOA may require car pooling. All construction parking must adhere to the parking plan communicated and approved at the "Pre-construction" meeting with the General Contractor and posted throughout the construction period. No parking at anytime can interfere with snow removal during the months of November 1st to May 1st or vehicle will be towed at owner's expense.
    9. The lot property boundaries will be marked by "T" stakes and colored rope to identify property boundary and not impact the adjacent areas except where such marking intersect with the ski trail. The placement of seasonal ski fence adjacent to Ski runs and Trails will be required and governed by DCMA.
    10. At no time will storage of any kind be allowed in roadways or shoulders. All building materials and equipment will be stored within the property boundaries unless DCMA approves. If approved to store/stage materials on shoulders by the DCMA, the contractor will be required to mark and identify limits to avoid damage to snow removal equipment. If damage occurs, even after approval and marking, the damages will be the responsibility of the General Contractor. At no time shall less than one full lane be available to traffic, and such traffic shall have priority. If at any time the road is temporarily blocked, the driver must help direct traffic.
    11. Concrete trucks will not be allowed to wash out in roadways and shoulders. The lot builder will be responsible to provide a wash out site for the trucks within the property boundaries, and at no time allowing the material to leave the property boundaries.
    12. General Contractor/Superintendent will be responsible for dust and mud mitigation. No mud/rocks or dirt from the building lot site is allowed on the pavement at anytime. Any violation will require immediate cleanup. Dust must be kept under control to avoid it blowing to the extent possible on a neighbor's home. Water dampening or covering can be required at anytime. Additional cleaning for adjoining homes affected by construction can be required by DCMA.
    13. General Contractor/Superintendent will be responsible for fire prevention during construction and smoking areas on lot construction site.
    14. Engine brake use is not allowed within the development near existing homes or the Hotel.
    15. Dogs will be allowed as long as they are kept on the job site and generate no complaints. The dog's owner shall be responsible for any incidents caused by their dog.
    16. At no time will hunting or firearms be allowed in the Deer Crest development.
    17. Ski Trails are normally closed to all construction access and activity. Access may be obtained only with written approval by DCMA. During the months of Nov. 1st thru June 1st, there will be no access for construction or adjacent excavation that would affect the ski trail due to the ski season unless previously approved by DCMA.
    18. At no time will the builder be allowed to place snow removed from the work area on roadways, shoulders, adjacent lots or open space without specific permission from the DCMA. If storage is allowed by DCMA on the shoulders then it is the responsibility of the builder to mark all locations and any damage caused by snow removal machines will be the responsibility of the builder. No snow removal storage will be allowed near a ski trail during ski season.
    19. At anytime DCMA may require reasonable expanded site clean up, to include roadways, open space, ski runs and trails adjacent to the lot.
    20. ALL ROADWAY REGULATIONS ARE STRICTLY ENFORCED AS POSTED.
    21. All construction traffic will access Deer Crest through the East gate (US 40) at all times; at no time will access through the West gate (Park City) be allowed.
    22. All construction signage will conform first to the Design Review Committee and then Wasatch / Summit County before installation. Any signage not conforming to these regulations will be required to be removed.
    23. Portable chemical toilet facilities must be in place at the time construction work is commenced and placed within the property boundaries. They cannot be stored on the roadway shoulders unless DCMA approves. They should be secured due to high winds. These facilities will be emptied regularly. Such facilities must be removed when construction is completed or construction is halted for more than 30 days. If deemed necessary, the DCMA may require additional services.
    24. During the performance of work, construction dumpsters or trash containers may be required to be covered by the DCMA. There will be no storage of these facilities in roadways or shoulders at anytime unless DCMA approves. At all times the lot contractor will keep the work site clean and free of debris, with no stockpiling of debris outside of one of these facilities. These facilities will be emptied regularly and serviced at no less than twice weekly intervals. Such facilities must be removed when construction is completed, or construction is halted for more than 30 days. If deemed necessary, DCMA may require additional services. At anytime the DCMA may require reasonable expanded site clean up, to include roadways, open space, ski runs and trails adjacent to the lot.
    25. When a crane is required for the construction of a project within Deer Crest the following shall apply;
      1. The contractor shall comply with all local, county and state requirements for installation, operation, inspection and maintenance of the crane.
      2. At no time shall a load of material ever pass over an adjacent structure.
      3. At no time shall a crane wind vane over an adjacent structure.
    26. Violations to the Deer Crest Home Builders Rules and Regulations will be subject to assessments through the CC&Rs, by the DCMA. The owner's security deposit will be the first source of payment for those costs. Non-compliance assessment items shall be as follows:

      Construction Regulation Violations

      • 1st Offense: $250
      • 2nd Offense: $500
      • 3rd Offense: $1000
      • 4th Offense and thereafter: $2,500 and the right to enforce a stop work order

      DCMA reserves the right to control vehicle access to Deer Crest at all times and based upon the following:

      Daily Parking Violations

      • 1st Offense: $25
      • 2nd Offense: $50
      • 3rd Offense: $100
      • 4th Offense: prohibited from entering property
    5.4.1 Final Inspection and Approval Upon Completion

    Upon completion of all improvements to the property, and the issuance of Certificates of Occupancy, the owner shall notify the DRC indicating that all improvements on the property are complete and are in conformance with the approved plans and specifications of the DRC. Upon receipt of the notification, the DRC must inspect the improvements within forty-five (45) days. After inspection, the DRC must notify the owner of either its final approval of the improvements or of its finding that the final improvements fail to comply with the approved plans and specifications. In the event the final improvements constructed by an owner are not in compliance with the plans and specifications submitted to and approved by the DRC, then the DRC, in its sole discretion, may require the owner to remedy such discrepancies to the extent set forth in the notification from the DRC to the owner which shall be issued not later than the conclusion of the forty-five (45) day completion inspection period. If the owner fails to remedy the non-conforming items to the reasonable satisfaction of the DRC within forty-five (45) days following receipt of the final inspection letter, then the DRC may draw upon the owner's bond or require additional cash deposits be made by the owner into a special account in order to provide sufficient funds to remedy the non-conforming items prior to final occupancy of the home by the lot owner or take whatever legal or other governmental action reasonably necessary to cause the owner to remedy the non-conforming items. Failure by the DRC to notify the owner of any non-compliance within forty-five (45) days after completion of inspection will constitute an approval of the improvements in question.


    After receiving final approval from the DRC, the property owner may request a refund from the DCMA of the remaining construction deposit if any amount remains to be refunded.


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    6.0 COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION RULES & REQUIREMENTS (update pending)

    7.0 DESIGN APPROVAL PROCESS & CONSTRUCTION ADMINISTRATION

    7.1 Approving Bodies

    The DRC reserves the right to review and amend these guidelines at anytime. These guidelines are subject to DRC interpretation. The DRC also reserves the right in extenuating circumstances to modify any requirements of these guidelines.

    The primary entity for approval of any improvements, construction or landscaping, or alterations thereof, within Deer Crest is the Deer Crest Design Review Committee (hereinafter "DRC"). Wasatch County will also review all construction documents previously approved by DRC. No design, drawings or specifications may be submitted to Wasatch County without first having been reviewed and stamped approved by the DRC.


    In addition to obtaining all necessary approvals from the DRC as set forth in the CC&Rs and these Design Guidelines, each property owner is obligated to obtain all necessary jurisdictional governmental approvals and to prepare plans and specifications in accordance with all applicable governmental laws and regulations affecting the use of his or her property and the improvements constructed thereon.


    Deer Crest, in an effort to maintain a high standard of architectural design, requires that all documents submitted for DRC approval be stamped and signed by a Utah State Licensed Architect. Surveying, Landscape Architecture and Structural Engineering related documents within the package must be certified by the respective licensed professionals.


    Approval of any proposed or existing improvement by the DRC shall not be construed to warrant or represent that the improvement was approved by or complies with the appropriate standards of any public agency that has jurisdiction over such improvement. Similarly, approval of any proposed or existing improvement by any public agency having jurisdiction over the improvement shall not constitute approval by the DRC.


    The DRC shall not be responsible for reviewing and/or approving any plans and specifications for engineering design, structural engineering and safety, or for compliance with applicable zoning, building or other county, state or federal laws, ordinances or policies.


    7.1.1 Design Review Committee

    The Design Review Committee shall consist of not more than five (5) members. The term of office shall be two (2) years commencing July 1 of each year. The committee shall consist of a chair and other members selected annually by the Board of the Deer Crest Master Association (DCMA). There shall be at least two licensed architects on the committee. The committee shall have and exercise all of the powers, duties and responsibilities set out in the Master Declaration. The committee shall meet on such schedules as may be established by the Chairman. A majority of its members shall constitute a quorum and the majority vote of a quorum present at a meeting shall be sufficient to approve action. Meetings may occur telephonically and actions may be approved by unanimous written consent of all committee members.


    All submittals to the DRC for review and approval should be made at the following address:


    Deer Crest Master Association DRC
    3672 Deer Crest Estates Drive
    Park City, Utah 84060
    Phone: (435) 655-8215

    The Deer Crest Master Association may, from time to time, change the address for the submittal of plans and specifications.


    7.2 The Process

    All required fees, bonds and deposits must be paid to the Deer Crest Master Association before any preliminary on-site work may be performed.


    Once a parcel or lot has been purchased, the purchaser shall:

    1. Engage a licensed land surveyor and/or landscape architect to conduct a site survey of the vegetation, topography at two (2) foot contour intervals and other natural site features and prepare an existing conditions map at a minimum scale of 1" = 20'. Members of the DRC will conduct a site visit to review and approve the existing conditions mapping in the field.
    2. Engage consultants (planner, engineer, architect) to prepare:
      1. A preliminary site plan showing dwelling coverage and other impervious elements at a minimum scale of 1" = 20'
      2. A grading, drainage, erosion control plan at a scale of 1" = 20':
        1. All lot grading plans must be prepared by an architect and/or civil engineer in accordance with all applicable Wasatch County regulations and ordinances and must be approved by the DRC and Wasatch County. All necessary bonds and/or deposits required by the DCMA and Wasatch County must be paid prior to commencing any grading work on a lot. The owner will also provide a report from a qualified soils engineer giving soil and geology clearance;
        2. Grading plans must include the following information;
          1. existing and proposed contours with a two (2) foot contour interval minimum;
          2. finished pad elevations;
          3. slopes with elevations of top and bottom of slope;
          4. surface and subsurface drainage provisions with top of grade and invert elevations, retaining walls with elevations at the top and bottom of wall, and locations and mountings for site improvements such as planters, accessory buildings, and walls;
        3. Surface drainage of paved areas must be sloped at standards established by Wasatch County and the DRC. Surface drainage of landscape areas and planted swales must be sloped to drain.
        4. Lots unable to meet the minimum surface drainage requirements must use a subsurface drainage system with drain inlets at adequate intervals;
        5. All drains must use approved inlets with appropriate grates. The minimum slope for the drains is one percent (1%). All above ground drainage devices must be colored to match the existing soil, landscape or hardscape color.
      3. A landscape plan showing areas to be irrigated by spray (1,600 sf max) and areas to be irrigated by drip methods (4,500 sf max.) at a minimum scale of 1" = 20'. Spray irrigation cannot cross property lines.
      4. Slope analysis at grades of 0-10%, 10-20%, 20-25%, 25%-30%, 30-35% and 35%+ at a minimum scale of 1" = 20'
      5. A minimum of two (2) site cross-sections to determine height of structures above natural grade at a minimum scale of 1" = 10'
      6. A fire control plan indicating nearest fire hydrant and proposed inflammable material at a minimum scale of 1"=10'-0".
      7. Schematic architectural drawings including floor plans and exterior building elevations at a scale 1/4" = 1'-0" to indicate exterior building materials on the elevations.
    3. Submit this Initial Preliminary Plan Package (items 1 and 2 above) to the DRC for the first review, comments and requested revisions or additional information requirements
    4. The Initial Preliminary Plan Package must include the application provided by the DRC with the following current information:
      1. Property owner's name
      2. Mailing address
      3. Business and resident telephone numbers including area code
      4. Lot or parcel number (site of proposed construction)
      5. Address of property
      6. Name, address and telephone number of the property owner's representative and/or consultants (architect, land planner, engineer, surveyor)
      7. List of drawings included
      8. Design Review and DCMA Security Deposit Fees ($6,500.00).
    5. A preliminary meeting shall be held at the property with the DRC and Owner's Architect during DRC's preliminary plan review. The corners of the residence shall be staked and be provided with height indicators if requested by the DRC. DRC will review view corridors, height restrictions and site related concerns of the subject property at this meeting.

    When all documentation has been submitted and any revisions or additional requirements to the initial preliminary plan package required by the DRC are complete, the property owner will submit a Revised Preliminary Plan Package to the DRC. The DRC will conduct a final plan review and prepare a written approval of the preliminary plan package.


    The DRC will have up to thirty (30) days to either approve or disapprove the proposed improvements as presented in the Preliminary Plan Package. Failure by the DRC to act within this thirty-day period shall constitute denial of the request set forth in the submittal. In the event of such denial through non-action by the DRC, the property owner may make formal written request for notification of the status of his submittal. This formal request constitutes a re-submittal of the Preliminary Plan Package. Failure by the DRC to act on this re-submittal within thirty calendar days will constitute approval of the submittal.


    Should the DRC disapprove a Preliminary Plan Package submittal, the property owner may have the right to appeal the decision to the DCMA pursuant to the Deer Crest CC&Rs.


    Once the property owner has the DRC's written approval, he may then authorize his consultants to begin preparation of construction documents. The Construction Documents Package must contain all of the documentation in the preliminary plan package together with complete construction drawings, landscape and irrigation plans, written specifications and a material sample board.


    The Construction Documents Package shall be submitted to the DRC for review, comments, and ultimate approval. The DRC shall again have up to thirty days to review and approve or disapprove the Construction Documents Package using the same procedures and in the same manner as the Preliminary Plan Package.


    Once any required DRC revisions and/or additions to the documentation are complete and reviewed, the DRC will issue written approval of the final construction documents package which can then be submitted to Wasatch County/Summit County/Park City for review, comments, approval and issuance of building and grading permits. No submission can be made to Wasatch County/Summit County/Park City without first obtaining written approval from the DRC. Wasatch County will not accept of receive construction documents without this written approval.


    When the property owner has obtained from Wasatch County a building permit, copies of the building permit must be provided to the DRC together with copies of the County's comments and additional requirements. The DRC reserves the right to impose additional requirements upon the property owner if the County's comments deviate from the previously approved plans. The DRC shall impose any additional requirements arising in conjunction with its review of the County's comments within thirty days of receipt of those comments.


    While you are considering your new home in Deer Crest it would be beneficial for you to get to know your neighbors as soon as possible. You can get their contact information from the HOA and then ask them about the neighborhood. As a common courtesy, once the DRC has had the on site meeting with you and your architect the Construction Coordinator will notify your neighbors that construction is being discussed. We urge you to consider the impact of your home and the landscaping on your neighbor's view corridors during the design process. We also suggest that you offer your neighbors a copy of your landscape plan and rendition of the home so they know what to expect when the home is completed. Listening to concerns they may raise will create a positive neighborhood atmosphere.


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    7.3 Fees, Deposits and Insurance

    7.3.1 Fees and Deposits

    Design Review fee in the amount of $6,500 must be submitted with the Preliminary Plan Package in order to initiate the design review process. The remaining amount of $58,500 must be recieved by the DRC before design approval.

    1. Design Review Fee - $6,500
    2. Construction Coordination Fee - $5,500
    3. Security Deposit - $3,000
    4. $50,000 completion deposit that is fully refundable.
    5. Excess Excavation Assessment Fee
    6. Blasting Monitor Fee ( if blasting is required)
    7. Insurance
    8. Remodel Fee

    7.3.1.1 Design Review Fees

    The $6,500 design review fee covers the cost to review and approve the initial project to submit for building permit and to perform administrative services and inspections to verify the approved plans and specifications are adheard to during the building process and following completion of the project, including without limitation, verification of construction materials, foundation height, ridge height, landscape walls, windows and all exterior materials.


    The cost of any additional review services that may be required by the DRC to fulfill its duties pertaining to a specific Lot will be $110.00 per hour billed to the lot Owner or their representitive.


    7.3.1.2 Construction Coordination Fee

    The Construction Coordination fee covers on site requirements during the building process. Any modification to the design during construction or after construction that requires further DRC design review or construction administrative time will be charged additional fees at an hourly rate. A fee schedule that discloses hourly rates may be obtained from the DRC office.


    7.3.1.3 Security Deposits

    The security deposits assure the proper clean-up of construction debris and limited repair of any damage to the landscaping, private streets, and entry gates within Deer Crest caused by the owners or agents in construction occurring on their site. In the event that this deposit is depleted during construction, the property owner must replenish the deposit before construction can continue. The $53,000 Deposit shall not limit the liability of owner to DCMA regarding any repair to any damage caused by the owner or the rights and remedies of DCMA against owner regarding such repair to any damage caused by owner.


    Any remaining portion of the deposits is to be refunded upon completion of the DRC final inspection item list.


    The security deposit fee may be increased at the discretion of the DCMA or the DRC.


    7.3.1.4 Completion Deposit for single family residence and Commercial Development

    Each Owner constructing a home on a single family estate lot is required to submit a Completion Deposit in the amount of Fifty Thousand Dollars ($50,000) to Deer Crest Master Association. The Completion Deposit must be received prior to commencement of any excavation on the Lot. The deposit shall be released to the original payer after completion of all items that have been addressed in the Final Inspection to the satisfaction of the DRC and DCMA. Failure to complete all final inspection items within the time agreed upon by the owner/builder and the DCMA will result in forfeiture of the deposit.


    Commercial Development. Each owner of a commercial property or condominium project will be required to negotiate the amount of and release dates and amounts relating to the Completion Deposit for such construction with the Design Review Committee. Such Completion Deposit shall be submitted (and funds must be cleared) prior to commencement of any excavation relating to such project and following county and Design Review Committee approval of the plans and specifications for such project.


    7.3.1.5 Excessive Excavation an Other Additional fees

    It will be the responsibility of the Owner/General Contractor to provide the estimate for the amount of soil to be removed from the construction area before final design approval. Excavation of more than 2500 cy yards will be charged an excessive excavation fee. This fee will be determined annually by the Board of trustees and will be based in the amount of excess excavation and miles travelled within the Deer Crest Development. The fee is currently $4.95 per truck, per mile. This charge will be based upon the estimate from the builder prior to final design approval and paid to the Deer Crest Master Association. Check must reference the overage excavation charge and lot #.


    DCMA may offer services that are better provided in a group rather than individual basis (e.g. parking/shoulder snow removal). DCMA will establish appropriate fees for these services based on contract costs. Owners can elect to participate. The timing and method of payment of these fees will be determined by DCMA.


    7.3.1.6 Blasting Fees

    In the event that blasting is required for construction of a building lot, payment of fees for all monitoring services conducted by Deer Crest's designated blasting consultant are the responsibility of the lot owner. See Appendix G for a complete description of the blasting controls.


    7.3.1.7 Insurance

    Prior to the commencement of construction, the property owner shall purchase and require his or her contractor to purchase general and auto liability insurance and shall maintain and cause contractors to maintain such insurance. Certificate(s) of Insurance must be maintained for the entire period of time necessary to construct the owner's improvements or any addition thereto in an amount not less than one million dollars ($1,000,000). Each liability insurance policy shall contain the following clauses:

    1. "This insurance shall not be canceled, limited in scope of coverage, or non-renewed until thirty days written notice has been given to the Deer Crest Master Association."
    2. "This insurance policy, which names the Deer Crest Master Association, Deer Crest Associates 1, LC, Utah Auspicious, LC, Grand Harvest Ventures, LC, and Dynamic Finance Corp., as additional insureds, is primary and any insurance maintained by such additional insured shall be non-contributing."
    7.3.1.8 Remodel Fees
    1. Incidental:   Exterior work with minimal impact on the home and/or the development or neighbors. This is work that does not require a permit from the local government authorities because it falls in a "Cosmetic" classification of work. You are required to notify the HOA of your project for an understanding of the impact and time frame for completion. The HOA may require a refundable Security Deposit depending on the scope of the project. This would not require any Design Review fee or Construction Coordination fee. All construction rules and regulations are required to be followed or fines may be implemented.
    2. Minor:   Exterior/interior work that will require a building permit from local government entities and would require constant direction for deliveries, work force parking, dust mitigation, noise abatement, garbage control and portable restrooms for workers. This would require a review approval from Design Review and hourly fee at an hourly rate from a Design Review member plus a $1000.00 fee for construction coordination. Also a $3000.00 completion deposit that is fully refundable at the completion and verification of the remodel. All construction rules are required to be followed.
    3. Major:   Full fees to be assessed on remodel with a change in current house footprint. This classification would be handled like any other new construction with the current deposits and fees put in place. All construction rules and regulations are required to be followed.
    7.3.1.9 Completion Date Requirement

    All homes should be completed in 18 months or less from Final Design Approval. Homes that take longer than 18 months to complete will have an additional fee for prolonged building of $500.00 per month. This fee will be drawn from the Security Deposit until home completion. If this deposit is depleted before construction is finished the fee will be drawn from the Construction Deposit until home completion.

    7.4 Construction Rules

    Each owner shall at all times conform and comply with all approved Plans and Specifications for the improvements on his property and otherwise conform and comply in all respects with the Design Guidelines as well as all applicable laws, ordinances, building codes, rules, regulations, orders and the like of Wasatch County or Park City as applicable, or any agency or department thereof and of any other governmental authority, agency or department having jurisdiction. Any deviation from the approved plans and guidelines must be reviewed and approved by the DRC. Failure to obtain such approval can result in a fine of up to $25,000 and the requirement to bring the project into compliance before further work can continue. Persistent violation of this rule by an architect or contractor may result in exclusion of such architect or contractor from any future projects at Deer Crest.


    The DRC shall have the authority and right at any time and from time to time at any reasonable hour to inspect improvements under construction for the purpose of determining whether the same comply in all respects with the applicable Plans and Specifications as approved by it, but it shall have no duty to make such inspection.


    Prior to construction the DRC shall require the following:

    1. Prior to any construction commencing the Contractor and DRC shall meet at the time for a Pre-Construction meeting.
    2. A copy of applicable governmental permits including Wasatch County or Park City Municipal Building Permit.
    3. Limits of disturbance must be identified and installed prior to any site work occurring; and the DRC shall inspect the site for compliance with this requirement prior to the property owner's commencement of construction. For LOD details refer to 4.1.5
    4. Owner shall be held responsible by DRC for compliance with all DRC rules and regulations.
    5. A final construction/day-labor parking plan and parking area must be approved by the DRC and coordinated by the Construction Coordinator. It may be required for specific lots to have overflow vehicle parking off site to minimize the impact blind corners or restricted roadways.
    6. A foundation survey varifying that no change has been made in the location of the improvement on the property from the approved "site plan" that was stamped by the DRC.

    During construction the owner shall cause the builder to conform to the following rules and regulations and will be responsible to the DRC for compliance:

    1. Builder shall satisfy all requirements of the Wasatch or Summit County Municipal Code and those requirements of any applicable governmental and/or private agencies for the hook-up of water, sewer, power, gas, telephone and any temporary use of such services.
    2. Access to Deer Crest property must be approved by the General Contractor for a specific lot or a designated person by them. All vehicular construction activity shall enter and exit only from the Jordanelle Gate to/from Highway 40. Entering the property constitutes acceptance of all liabilities set forth in the sign in sheet. For subcontractors working less then two weeks, signing in is sufficient. For subcontractors working more than two weeks, they will be required to have an access card provided by their General Contractor through the Queen Esther Gatehouse.
    3. At any and all times during construction, a representitive of the General Contractor's company will be on-site and available.
    4. No access for workers or construction work may take place before 8:00 a.m. or after 7:00 p.m. No construction work is to be conducted on Sundays or the following holidays: New Years Eve, New Years Day, Presidents Day, Memorial Day, Fourth of July, Labor Day , Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. Interior finish work can be allowed during these restrictions only with written approval by the Deer Crest Master Association (DCMA). Vehicles 1 ton or larger and material deliveries must be scheduled between 8:00 am to 6:00 pm unless prior approval is obtained by DCMA. All loading, unloading and hauling on roadways will conform to required Wasatch County Municipal Codes. These codes will be strictly adhered to and monitored by the lot site superintendent. If any staging takes one third of the road, you will be required to post signage and flaggers during this process. At no time shall less than one full lane be available to traffic, and such traffic shall have priority. If at any time the road is temporarily blocked, the driver must help direct traffic.
    5. At no time will the removal or modification of the following items be allowed: roadways, curbs, shoulders, guardrails, tunnels, bridges, welded wire walls, utilities and landscaping. The home builder will pay for any damage to these items.
    6. The removal, replacement or adding of guardrail for the driveway access must be in strict compliance with Wasatch, Summit County or DCMA and will be the responsibility of the homebuilder.
    7. All noise abatement laws of Wasatch and Summit County or DCMA will be adhered to during construction.
    8. All construction parking must adhere to the parking plan communicated and approved at the "Pre-construction" meeting with the General Contractor. A construction/day-labor parking plan and parking area must be approved by the DRC and coordinated by the Construction Coordinator. It may be required for specific lots to have overflow vehicle parking off site to minimize the impact blind corners or restricted roadways. A limit of vehicles will be determined by construction location. HOA may require car pooling. All construction parking must adhere to the parking plan communicated and approved at the "Pre-construction" meeting with the General Contractor and posted throughout the construction period. No parking at anytime can interfere with snow removal during the months of November 1st to May 1st or vehicle will be towed at owner's expense.
    9. The lot property boundaries will be marked by "T" stakes and colored rope to identify property boundary and not impact the adjacent areas except where such marking intersect with the ski trail. The placement of seasonal ski fence adjacent to Ski runs and Trails will be required and governed by DCMA.
    10. At no time will storage of any kind be allowed in roadways or shoulders. All building materials and equipment will be stored within the property boundaries unless DCMA approves. If approved to store/stage materials on shoulders by the DCMA, the contractor will be required to mark and identify limits to avoid damage to snow removal equipment. If damage occurs, even after approval and marking, the damages will be the responsibility of the General Contractor. At no time shall less than one full lane be available to traffic, and such traffic shall have priority. If at any time the road is temporarily blocked, the driver must help direct traffic.
    11. Concrete trucks will not be allowed to wash out in roadways and shoulders. The lot builder will be responsible to provide a wash out site for the trucks within the property boundaries, and at no time allowing the material to leave the property boundaries.
    12. General Contractor/Superintendent will be responsible for dust and mud mitigation. No mud/rocks or dirt from the building lot site is allowed on the pavement at anytime. Any violation will require immediate cleanup. Dust must be kept under control to avoid it blowing to the extent possible on a neighbor's home. Water dampening or covering can be required at anytime. Additional cleaning for adjoining homes affected by construction can be required by DCMA.
    13. General Contractor/Superintendent will be responsible for fire prevention during construction and smoking areas on lot construction site.
    14. Engine brake use is not allowed within the development near existing homes or the Hotel.
    15. Dogs will be allowed as long as they are kept on the job site and generate no complaints. The dog's owner shall be responsible for any incidents caused by their dog.
    16. At no time will hunting or firearms be allowed in the Deer Crest development.
    17. Ski Trails are normally closed to all construction access and activity. Access may be obtained only with written approval by DCMA. During the months of Nov. 1st thru June 1st, there will be no access for construction or adjacent excavation that would affect the ski trail due to the ski season unless previously approved by DCMA.
    18. At no time will the builder be allowed to place snow removed from the work area on roadways, shoulders, adjacent lots or open space without specific permission from the DCMA. If storage is allowed by DCMA on the shoulders then it is the responsibility of the builder to mark all locations and any damage caused by snow removal machines will be the responsibility of the builder. No snow removal storage will be allowed near a ski trail during ski season.
    19. At anytime DCMA may require reasonable expanded site clean up, to include roadways, open space, ski runs and trails adjacent to the lot.
    20. ALL ROADWAY REGULATIONS ARE STRICTLY ENFORCED AS POSTED.
    21. All construction traffic will access Deer Crest through the East gate (US 40) at all times; at no time will access through the West gate (Park City) be allowed.
    22. All construction signage will conform first to the Design Review Committee and then Wasatch / Summit County before installation. Any signage not conforming to these regulations will be required to be removed.
    23. Portable chemical toilet facilities must be in place at the time construction work is commenced and placed within the property boundaries. They cannot be stored on the roadway shoulders unless DCMA approves. They should be secured due to high winds. These facilities will be emptied regularly. Such facilities must be removed when construction is completed or construction is halted for more than 30 days. If deemed necessary, the DCMA may require additional services.
    24. During the performance of work, construction dumpsters or trash containers may be required to be covered by the DCMA. There will be no storage of these facilities in roadways or shoulders at anytime unless DCMA approves. At all times the lot contractor will keep the work site clean and free of debris, with no stockpiling of debris outside of one of these facilities. These facilities will be emptied regularly and serviced at no less than twice weekly intervals. Such facilities must be removed when construction is completed, or construction is halted for more than 30 days. If deemed necessary, DCMA may require additional services. At anytime the DCMA may require reasonable expanded site clean up, to include roadways, open space, ski runs and trails adjacent to the lot.
    25. No unsightliness shall be permitted upon any of the property, without limiting the generality of the foregoing:
      (a) any unsightly structures, facilities, equipment, tools, vehicles other than automobiles, object and conditions shall be enclosed within an approved building or appropriately screened from view, except equipment and tools when in actual use for construction, maintenance and repairs.
      (b) no lumber, grass, shrub or tree clippings, plant waste, metals, bulk materials or scrap shall be kept, stored or allowed to accumulate on the property.
    26. When a crane is required for the construction of a project within Deer Crest the following shall apply;
      1. The contractor shall comply with all local, county and state requirements for installation, operation, inspection and maintenance of the crane.
      2. At no time shall a load of material ever pass over an adjacent structure.
      3. At no time shall a crane wind vane over an adjacent structure.
    27. Violations to the Deer Crest Home Builders Rules and Regulations will be subject to assessments through the CC&Rs, by the DCMA. The owner's security deposit will be the first source of payment for those costs. Non-compliance assessment items shall be as follows:

      Construction Regulation Violations

      • 1st Offense: $250
      • 2nd Offense: $500
      • 3rd Offense: $1000
      • 4th Offense and thereafter: $2,500 and the right to enforce a stop work order

      DCMA reserves the right to control vehicle access to Deer Crest at all times and based upon the following:

      Daily Parking Violations

      • 1st Offense: $25
      • 2nd Offense: $50
      • 3rd Offense: $100
      • 4th Offense: prohibited from entering property

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    `

    7.5  Surveyor's Requirement During Construction:

    1. Surveyor's Certification
      1. Submit a Foundation Location Letter of Certification when the building foundations are complete.
      2. Submit a Building Height Letter of Certification when the rough framing is complete.
        Surveyor:
        Name_______________________________________________________
        Phone #_____________________________________________________
    2. A final inspection will be conducted prior to occupancy to confirm that the work has been completed in compliance with the approved construction drawings. All information required within this document shall have been provided prior to proceeding with the projects final inspection.

    I have reviewed and agree to the procedures and guidelines presented in this Construction Information Submittal. The information requested in this form will be provided upon request to the Design Review Committee when it is available.


    7.6 Final Inspection and Approval Upon Completion

    Upon completion of all improvements to the property, and the issuance of Certificates of Occupancy, the owner shall notify the DRC indicating that all improvements on the property are complete and are in conformance with the approved plans and specifications of the DRC. Upon receipt of the notification, the DRC must inspect the improvements within forty-five (45) days. After inspection, the DRC must notify the owner of either its final approval of the improvements or of its finding that the final improvements fail to comply with the approved plans and specifications. In the event the final improvements constructed by an owner are not in compliance with the plans and specifications submitted to and approved by the DRC, then the DRC, in its sole discretion, may require the owner to remedy such discrepancies to the extent set forth in the notification from the DRC to the owner which shall be issued not later than the conclusion of the forty-five (45) day completion inspection period. If the owner fails to remedy the non-conforming items to the reasonable satisfaction of the DRC within forty-five (45) days following receipt of the final inspection letter, then the DRC may draw upon the owner's bond or require additional cash deposits be made by the owner into a special account in order to provide sufficient funds to remedy the non-conforming items prior to final occupancy of the home by the lot owner or take whatever legal or other governmental action reasonably necessary to cause the owner to remedy the non-conforming items. Failure by the DRC to notify the owner of any non-compliance within forty-five (45) days after completion of inspection will constitute an approval of the improvements in question.

    After receiving final approval from the DRC, the property owner may request a refund from the DCMA of the remaining construction deposit if any amount remains to be refunded.


    Only upon completion of all Final Inspection items and the issuance of the Certificates of Occupancy by Wasatch County or Park City Municipal indicating that all improvements on the property are complete and are in conformance with the approved plans and specifications of the DRC shall the Completion Deposit be eligible for return. Failure to complete the Final Inspection items and provide a copy of the Certificate of Occupancy to the satisfaction of the DCMA, within the agreed time frame, will result in forfeiture of all deposits and a recording of a notice of non-compliance with the appropriate governing body.


    After receiving final approval from the DRC, the property owner is eligible to receive a refund from the DCMA of the remaining construction deposit. This amount will include the $3,000 security deposit and $50,000 completion deposit less any amounts assessed for damage to infrastructure improvements or violations of the construction regulations.


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    APPENDIX A

    NATIVE TREES AND SHRUBS

    The following trees and shrubs are native to the Intermountain (Deer Crest) area. Primarily these trees and shrubs are hardy in Zones 2, 3 and 4.

    APPENDIX B

    FIRE RESISTANT VEGETATION

    The following is adopted in part from an USDA Forest Service Research Paper by Eamor Nord and Lisle Green, published by Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Riverdale, California.


    Fire resistant vegetation consists of grasses, forbs, shrubs, and trees that do not readily ignite and burn when subjected to fire because of the inherent physiological characteristics of the species such as heat content, chemical composition, moisture content, fuel arrangement, and fuel loading.

    Plants to be used primarily for fire hazard reduction must meet more stringent requirements than for other uses. Plants should fulfill most of these criteria:

    1. Low Volume - Amount of woody and herbaceous material produced over a period of years, not just current production.
    2. Adaptability - Must be adaptable to dry sites and to a moderately broad range of elevations, aspects, temperatures, and soils.
    3. Growth Form - Low-growing, prostate shrubs that creep along the ground are best.
    4. Reproduction - Species or varieties which reproduce vegetatively as well as by seed. Preferred plants can be established on wildland sites by direct seeding. Other methods are more costly.
    5. Root Systems - Deep, multiple-branched, and fast growing root systems.
    6. Relative Flammability - Plants containing high moisture content in foliage, preferably over 75 percent during the summer season, are preferred. High moisture content is frequently correlated with salt or ash content of the foliage.
    7. Palatability - Desirable except during the establishment stage when grazing, browsing, or clipping by livestock or wildlife can destroy young plants.

    Following is a brief guide to vegetation that should be used in fire hazard reduction plantings:

    Grasses and Forbs
    Shrubs
    Broadleaf Trees

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    APPENDIX C

    DEER CREST LANDSCAPE PLANT PALETTE

    The following plant materials are approved for use on the Deer Crest property:

    Evergreen Trees
    Botanical Name Common Name
    Abies lasiocarpa Alpine Fir
    Picea pungens Colorado Spruce
    Picea englemannii Englemann Spruce
    Deciduous Trees
    Botanical Name Common Name
    Acer ginnala Amur Maple
    Acer grandidentatum Bigtooth Maple
    Celtis occidentalis Common Hackberry
    Fraxinus pennsylvanica "Patmore" Patmore Ash*
    Fraxinus pennsylvanica "Summit" Summit Ash*
    Malus "Dolgo" Dolgo Crabapple*
    Malus "Kelsey" Kelsey Crabapple*
    Malus "Radiant" Radiant Crabapple*
    Populus tremuloides Quaking Aspen
    Prunus Maackii Amur Chokecherry
    Prunus padus Mayday Tree*
    Prunus virginiana Chokecherry
    Ground Cover
    Botanical Name Common Name
    Arctostaphylos uva-ursi Kinnikinnick
    Cerastium tomentosa Snow-in-Summer
    Mahonia repens Creeping Mahonia
    Potentilla cinerea Cinquefoil
    Thymus lanuginosus Woolly Thyme
    Vinca major Periwinkle
    Vinca minor Dwarf Periwinkle
    Large/Medium Size Shrubs
    Botanical Name Common Name
    Amelanchier alnifolia Saskatoon Serviceberry
    Cercocarpus ledifolius Curleaf Mountain Mahogany
    Cornus Sericea Red-Osler Dogwood
    Physocarpus opulifolius Ninebark*
    Pinus mugo Mugho Pine
    Prunus tomentosa Nanking Cherry*
    Rhus Glabra Smooth Sumac
    Rose rugosa Rugosa Rose*
    Sorbaria sorbifolia Ashleaf Spiraea*
    Symphoricarpos albus Common Snowberry
    Syringa prestoniae Hardy Lilac
    Viburnum trilobum American cranberrybush*
    Small/Accent Shrubs
    Botanical Name Common Name
    Cornus sericea "Kelsey" Dwarf Kelsey Dogwood
    Juniperus communis Common Juniper
    Chrysothamnus nauseosus Rabbitbrush
    Physocarpus opulifolius "Darts Gold" Darts Gold Ninebark*
    Physocarpus opulifolius "Nanus" Dwarf Ninebark*
    Potentilla fruticosa Shrubby Cinquefoil
    Prunus tenella Dwarf Russian Almond*
    Rhus glabra "Cismontana" Dwarf Smooth Sumac
    Rhus trilobata Squawbush
    Ribes alpinum Alpine Currant
    Rosa woodsii Woods Rose
    Vines
    Botanical Name Common Name
    Parthenocissus quinquefolia Virginia Creeper*
    Clematis viticella Virgin's Bower
    Clematis columbiana Rock Climate
    Perennials and Wild Flowers
    Botanical Name Common Name
    Achillea filipendulinaFernleaf Yarrow
    Achillea ptarmica Yarrow
    Achillea tomentosa Woolly Yarrow
    Alyssum saxatile Basket of Gold
    Anthemis tictoria Golden Marguerite
    Aquilegia caerulea Blue Columbine
    Aguilegia formosa Western Columbine
    Aquilegia vulgaris Garden Columbine
    Armeria maritima Common Thrift
    Castilleja sp. Indian Paintbrush
    Centaurea dealbata Bachelor Button
    Chrysanthemum leucanthemum Oxeye Daisy
    Coreopsis lanceolata Coreopsis
    Dianthus deltoides Maiden Pinks
    Epilobium angustifolium Fireweed
    Fragaria vesca Wild Strawberry
    Gaillardia aristata Yellow Blanket Flower
    Gaillardia grandiflora Burgundy Blanket Flower
    Galium odoratum Sweet Woodruff
    Geranium viscosissimum Wild Geranium
    Hemerocallis sp. Daylillies
    Liatris pycnostachya Kansas Gayfeather
    Liatris spicata Tall Gayfeather
    Linum lewisii Blue Flax
    Lupinus Argentens Silvery Lupine
    Lupinus sericeus Silky Lupine
    Penstemon cyananthus Wasatch Penstemon
    Penstemon eatoni Firecracker Penstemon
    Penstemon palmeri Palmer Penstemon
    Penstemon pinifolius Fernleaf Penstemon
    Penstemon strictus "Bandara" Rocky Mountain Penstemon
    Phlox subulata Moss Pink
    Physostegia virginiana Obedient Plant
    Saponaria ocymoides Rock Soapwort
    Solidago missouriensis Goldenrod

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    APPENDIX D

    LOT COVERAGE TABULATIONS
    AREA FOR LOTS / DEER CREST PHASE I
    Lot No. Lot Acreage Lot S.F. Area Dwelling Coverage Other impervious Coverage S.F. Floor Area S.F. Floor Area w/ Garage
    1 0.90 39,247 5,970 3,45610,40011,000
    2 0.64 27,707 5,297 3,0359,1069,706
    3 0.64 27,895 5,312 3,0459,1349,734
    4 0.60 26,111 5,169 2,9568,8679,467
    5 0.75 32,788 5,703 3,2899,86810,468
    6 0.70 30,285 5,503 3,1649,49310,093
    7 0.92 39,875 5,995 3,47210,450 11,050
    8 0.98 42,894 6,116 3,54710,69211,292
    9 0.59 25,810 5,145 2,9418,8229,422
    10 0.62 26,902 5,232 2,9958,9859,585
    11 0.72 31,191 5,575 3,2109,62910,229
    12 0.75 32,711 5,697 3,2869,85710,457
    13 1.00 43,383 6,135 3,56010,73111,331
    14 0.76 33,255 5,730 3,3069,92010,520
    15 0.69 30,001 5,480 3,1509,45010,050
    16 0.77 33,673 5,747 3,3179,95410,554
    17 0.65 28,384 5,351 3,0699,2089,808
    18 1.02 44,462 6,174 3,58410,81711,417
    19 0.75 32,766 5,701 3,2889,86510,465
    20 2.54 110,8148,164 4,91116,12516,725
    21 1.15 50,237 6,347 3,70011,27911,879
    22 0.69 30,058 5,485 3,1539,45910,059
    23 0.79 34,367 5,775 3,33410,00910,609
    24 1.45 63,067 6,732 3,95612,30512,905
    25 0.68 29,611 5,449 3,1319,3929,992
    Lot No. Lot Acreage Lot S.F. Area Dwelling Coverage Other impervious Coverage S.F. Floor Area S.F. Floor Area w/ Garage
    26 0.69 29,975 5,478 3,1499,44610,046
    27 0.90 38,987 5,959 3,45010,37910,979
    28 0.93 40,646 6,026 3,49110,51211,112
    29 0.76 33,095 5,724 3,3029,90810,508
    30 0.75 32,507 5,681 3,2759,82610,426
    31 0.76 32,954 5,716 3,2989,89310,493
    32 0.79 34,397 5,7763,33510,01210,612
    33 0.80 34,770 5,791 3,34410,04210,642
    34 0.76 32,927 5,714 3,2969,88910,489
    35 0.83 36,331 5,853 3,38310,16610,766
    36 0.76 33,053 5,722 3,3019,90410,504
    37 0.89 38,702 5,948 3,44310,35610,956
    38 0.86 37,349 5,894 3,40910,24810,848
    39 1.29 56,355 6,531 3,82211,76812,368
    40 1.05 45,540 6,206 3,60610,90311,503
    41 0.79 34,204 5,768 3,3309,99610,596
    42 0.87 37,892 5,916 3,42210,29110,891
    43 0.81 35,198 5,808 3,35510,07610,676
    44 0.86 37,570 5,903 3,41410,26610,866
    45 0.91 39,652 5,986 3,46610,43211,032
    46 0.76 33,305 5,732 3,3089,92410,524
    47 0.56 24,388 5,031 2,8698,6089,208
    48 0.62 26,981 5,238 2,9998,9979,597
    49 1.00 43,761 6,150 3,56910,76111,361
    50 0.59 25,660 5,133 2,9338,7999,399
    Lot No. Lot Acreage Lot S.F. Area Dwelling Coverage Other impervious Coverage S.F. Floor Area S.F. Floor Area w/ Garage
    510.59 25,848 5,148 2,9428,8279,427
    52 0.81 35,226 5,809 3,35610,07810,678
    53 1.05 45,654 6,210 3,60810,91211,512
    54 0.74 32,055 5,644 3,2539,75810,358
    55 1.22 53,215 6,436 3,75911,51712,117
    56 0.61 26,557 5,205 2,9788,9349,534
    57 0.73 31,802 5,624 3,2409,72010,320
    58 0.99 43,079 6,123 3,55210,70611,306
    59 0.70 30,685 5,535 3,1849,55310,153
    60 0.81 35,184 5,807 3,35510,07510,675
    61 0.85 37,116 5,885 3,40310,22910,829
    62 0.79 34,323 5,773 3,33310,00610,606
    63 0.70 30,320 5,506 3,1669,49810,098
    64 0.50 21,961 4,833 2,7468,2388,838
    65 0.53 23,061 4,925 2,8038,4099,009
    66 0.70 30,400 5,512 3,1709,51010,110
    67 0.74 32,292 5,663 3,2659,79410,394
    68 1.01 43,891 6,156 3,57210,77111,371
    69 0.54 23,530 4,962 2,8278,4809,080
    70 0.90 39,421 5,977 3,46110,41411,014
    71 0.66 28,654 5,372 3,0839,2489,848
    72 0.79 34,449 5,778 3,33610,01610,616
    73 1.28 55,923 6,518 3,81311,73412,334
    74 0.62 26,867 5,229 2,9938,9809,580
    75 0.65 28,311 5,345 3,0669,1979,797
    Lot No. Lot Acreage Lot S.F. Area Dwelling Coverage Other impervious Coverage S.F. Floor Area S.F. Floor Area w/ Garage
    76 0.62 26,945 5,236 2,9978,9929,592
    77 0.54 23,638 4,971 2,8328,4969,096
    78 0.78 34,158 5,766 3,3299,99310,593
    79 0.73 31,713 5,617 3,2369,70710,307
    80 0.87 37,823 5,913 3,42110,28610,886
    81 0.60 25,945 5,156 2,9478,8429,442
    82 0.78 34,080 5,763 3,3279,98610,586
    83 0.72 31,311 5,585 3,2169,64710,247
    84 0.76 32,946 5,716 3,2979,89210,492
    85 0.81 35,153 5,806 3,35410,07210,672
    86 0.74 32,074 5,646 3,2549,76110,361
    87 0.62 27,105 5,248 3,0059,0169,616
    88 0.67 29,256 5,420 3,1139,3389,938
    89 0.69 30,165 5,493 3,1589,47510,075
    90 0.69 29,922 5,474 3,1469,43810,038
    91 0.87 37,721 5,909 3,41810,27810,878
    92 0.62 27,047 5,244 3,0029,0079,607
    93 0.62 27,183 5,255 3,0099,0279,627
    94 0.62 26,917 5,233 2,9968,9889,588
    95 0.64 27,838 5,307 3,0429,1269,726
    96 0.60 26,073 5,166 2,9548,8619,461
    97 0.57 24,663 5,053 2,8838,6499,249
    98 0.79 34,628 5,785 3,34110,03010,630
    99 0.70 30,644 5,532 3,1829,54710,147
    100 1.23 53,438 6,443 3,76411,53512,135
    Lot No. Lot Acreage Lot S.F. Area Dwelling Coverage Other impervious Coverage S.F. Floor Area S.F. Floor Area w/ Garage
    101 0.61 26,600 5,208 2,9808,9409,540
    102 0.67 28,989 5,399 3,0999,2989,898
    103 0.62 26,870 5,230 2,9948,9819,581
    104 0.70 30,487 5,519 3,1749,52310,123
    105 0.78 34,148 5,766 3,3299,99210,592
    106 1.33 57,992 6,580 3,85511,89912,499
    107 1.14 49,669 6,330 3,68811,23411,834
    108 0.88 38,230 5,929 3,43110,31810,918
    109 0.74 32,450 5,676 3,2739,81810,418
    110 0.67 29,111 5,409 3,1069,3179,917
    111 0.66 28,595 5,368 3,0809,2399,839
    112 0.87 37,858 5,914 3,42110,28910,889
    113 1.14 49,687 6,331 3,68911,23511,835
    114 0.86 37,415 5,897 3,41010,25310,853
    115 0.90 39,020 5,961 3,45110,38210,982
    116 0.98 42,657 6,106 3,54110,67311,273
    117 0.79 34,304 5,772 3,33310,00410,604
    118 0.87 37,703 5,908 3,41810,27610,876
    119 0.87 37,940 5,918 3,42410,29510,895
    120 0.76 33,025 5,721 3,3019,90210,502
    121 1.02 44,356 5,171 3,58210,80811,408
    122 4.91 213,709 11,2516,96924,35724,957
    123 1.38 60,187 6,646 3,89912,07512,675
    124 1.28 55,916 6,517 3,81311,73312,333
    125 0.80 35,052 5,802 3,35110,06410,664
    146 1.14 49,564 6,327 3,68611,22511,825
    AREA FOR DEER HOLLOW LOTS
    Lot No. Lot Acreage Lot S.F. Area Dwelling Coverage Other impervious Coverage S.F. Floor Area S.F. Floor Area w/ Garage
    1260.9240,2216,0093,48110,47811,078
    1271.0846,9986,2503,63511,02011,620
    1281.3659,0736,6123,87611,98612,586
    1291.4061,0406,6713,91612,14312,743
    1301.3056,7756,5433,83111,80212,402
    AREAS FOR UPCM LOTS
    Lot No. Lot Acreage Lot S.F. Area Dwelling Coverage Other impervious Coverage S.F. Floor Area S.F. Floor Area w/ Garage
    1U2.77120,6398,4595,10816,91117,511
    2U2.1091,4277,5834,52414,57415,174
    3U0.7733,6835,7473,3179,95510,555
    4U0.9842,6316,1053,54110,67011,270
    5U1.0947,3626,2613,64211,04911,649
    6U1.2554,5016,4753,78511,62012,220
    7U0.9340,6866,0273,49210,51511,115
    8U0.9541,2746,0513,50710,56211,162
    9U0.9239,9185,9973,47310,45311,053
    10U1.3960,3496,6503,90212,08812,688
    11U1.1550,2346,3473,70011,27911,879
    12U0.6327,3875,2713,0199,0589,658
    AREAS FOR SNOWTOP LOTS
    Lot No. Lot Acreage Lot S.F. Area Dwelling CoverageOther impervious Coverage S.F. Floor Area S.F. Floor Area w/ Garage
    1310.5122,3744,8702,7698,3068,906
    1320.5925,4985,1202,9258,7759,375
    1330.6226,9485,2362,9978,9929,592
    1340.9842,8486,1143,54610,68811,288
    1350.9943,2446,1303,55610,72011,320
    1360.5122,0884,8472,7548,2638,863
    1370.5021,7144,7892,7218,1648,764
    1380.5021,8284,8092,7338,1988,798
    1390.5021,8464,8122,7358,2048,804
    1400.8336,0255,8413,37610,14210,742
    1410.8637,5555,9023,41410,26410,864
    1420.5323,2854,9432,8148,4439,043
    1430.5724,6705,0542,8848,6519,251
    1440.8737,7735,9113,41910,28210,882
    1450.7331,8555,6283,2439,72810,328

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    APPENDIX E

    GRAPHIC DESCRIPTIONS

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    1. Fence Walls & Retaining Walls
    2. Stepped Retaining Walls
    3. Limits of Disturbance
    4. Building Pad & Building Envelope
    5. Building Scale Reduction on Successive Floors
    6. Maximum Building Height
    7. Special Height Restrictions
    8. Ascending Pitch Height Restrictions
    9. Basement Definition
    10. Retaining Walls as Guardrails

    APPENDIX F

    SPECIAL HEIGHT RESTRICTION DESIGNATIONS

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    Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    Lots 8, 9, 10, 11, 12,
    Lots 14, 15, 16, 17, 18,
    Lots 19, 20, 21,
    Lots 23
    Lots 24, 25, 26
    Lots 27
    Lots 29
    Lots 30, 31, 32
    Lots 33, 34, 35, 36
    Lots 37, 38, 39, 40, 41
    Lots 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50
    Lots 51, 52, 53
    Lots 54
    Lots 56, 57, 58
    Lots 61, 62, 63
    Lots 65, 66, 67
    Lots 68, 69, 70, 71, 72
    Lots 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78
    Lots 80, 81, 83, 84, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92
    Lots 93
    Lots 94
    Lots 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 106, 108, 109, 110, 111
    Lots 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119
    Lots 120, 121, 122
    Lots 124, 125, 126
    Lots 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136
    Lots 137, 138, 139
    Lots 140, 141, 142
    Lots 143, 144, 145
    Lots 1U, 2U
    Lots 3U, 4U, 5U, 6U, 7U, 8U
    Lots 9U, 10U, 11U, 12U

    APPENDIX G

    BLASTING POLICY REGULATIONS
    PROJECT BLASTING REGULATIONS

    These regulations are in place for the benefit of the Homeowner, Home Builder, Project Developer and the Homeowners Association's as protection against damage, caused by blasting, to structures, roads and utilities throughout the site. Deer Crest has designated Salt Lake Seismic Services (SLSS) to provide special monitoring services when blasting is conducted on any Deer Crest Estates building lot. At the cost of the Lot Owner, SLSS will monitor all blasting activities on the mountain on behalf of Deer Crest to ensure that the following blasting criteria is met. Payment of all special inspections and blasting plan review fees charged by SLSS is the responsibility of the lot owner. The representative for SLSS is Ruth Anderson and she can be reached at (801) 250-4088.


    GUIDE LINES AND REGULATIONS
    1. Blast plans will be submitted to SLSS five days before any blasting on the site. When you receive the blast plan back there will be a comment sheet attached with your plan, with noted requirements and recommendations from SLSS
    2. Items to include in the blast plan are:
      • Plot plan showing measured distance to any structures, underground utilities, or roads surrounding your site
      • Maximum pounds per delay
      • Type of powder used
      • Depth, size and spacing of holes
      • Burden and stemming
      • Predicted inches per second
    3. The specified maximum allowable inches per second for the overall site will be 2 ips, unless otherwise noted by (SLSS) or Deer Crest on the comment sheet.
    4. Upon receiving your blast plan with the comments and recommendations, you will be expected to notify SLSS 24 hrs before any blasting on your site. This allows them the time to set the seismic monitoring equipment on any surrounding structures and to verify that your blasting company has followed all the requirements noted on your blast plan.
    5. Blasting materials not allowed on this site:
      • detonating cords
      • cap fuses
    6. Federal, State and local blasting and explosive permits will be obtained before the transportation, handling, storage or use of explosives or blasting agents on this project.
    7. Federal, State and local regulations relative to the transportation, storage and use of explosives or blasting agents will be followed closely and the required records of inventory and use will be maintained at your site at all times.
    8. The transportation, storage and use of explosives or blasting agents will always be under the supervision of a blaster qualified and experienced in their intended use, and possessing the appropriate blaster's permit license.
    9. Careful selection of blasting materials to be used will be made with the manufacture's assistance, giving the primary consideration to such factors as the proximity of all surrounding structures, roads, utilities, electrical currents (particularly electrical storms), fire and heat hazards, flyrock hazards, storage, transportation and any other particular loading and firing hazards.
    10. Magazines will be located in accordance with "American Table of Distances for Storage of Explosives." Accurate and current inventory sheets are to be maintained at each magazine showing every magazine transaction. SLSS and Deer Crest construction management will review the storage of any explosives on this site.
    11. Explosives will only be transported between magazine and the blast by an approved vehicle specifically assigned an approved for that purpose, and not carrying any other material, tools, equipment or personal, other than a helper.
    12. The blaster will determine that the roads are posted and clear of personal, equipment, potential down hill obstacles and excess blasting materials before shooting. The following audible warning signals are mandatory to this site for all blasting operations:
      • WARNING SIGNAL- a one-minute series of long signals five minutes before the blast.
      • BLASTING SIGNAL- a series of short signals one minute before the blast.
      • ALL CLEAR SIGNAL- one long signal after a complete inspection of the blast area.
    13. After gases and dust have cleared (at least five minutes for surface blasting, fifteen minutes in tunnels) the blaster will thoroughly inspect the blast area for indicators of misfires and any other hazardous conditions resulting from the effects of the blast. Only after the blast is safe will the ALL-CLEAR SIGNAL be sounded.
    14. If examination of the blast area reveals any indication of possible unexploded charges, the area is to be made safe under the supervision of the blaster by one of the following means. AFTER a 60-minute wait following fuse blasting or a 30-minute wait following all other blasting methods.
      • A new primer will be inserted in a hole and the hole re-blasted.
      • Where the hole cannot be re-blasted, the stemming and explosives will be washed out with water.
    15. After each blast the blaster will complete a record of each blast including date, time, weather conditions, shot pattern, depth of holes, quantity of explosives, number of detonators, misfires if any and any other pertinent information.
    16. If the monitoring of your blast indicates that you exceeded the 2-inches per second on any certain structure, road or utilities surrounding your site, you will be required to take the following steps to insure both Deer Crest and SLSS that there has been no damage done:
      • All blasting will stop immediately the blast area will be cleared and made safe for investigation by SLSS.
      • If deemed necessary the surrounding structures will be x-rayed for any structural damage. The x-ray will be paid by the homebuilder.
      • The blast plan will be reevaluated for any misunderstandings to SLSS requirements.
    17. All damage resulting from blasting will be repaired by the homebuilder within 48 hours of occurrence. Deer Crest will conduct an inspection to verify that all damage has been repaired. Failure to comply with the above mentioned regulations will result in a violation of the CC&R's and all available remedies contained in the CC&R's will apply.

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    APPENDIX H

    DEFINITION OF TERMS

    BUILDING ENVELOPE: Each lot on the Plat illustrates the maximum "building envelope" that is allowed on single family estate lots. The building envelope is the area that the home must be built within.


    LIMITS OF DISTURBANCE: An area within each lot where grading and vegetation removal is allowed and where the dwelling and all improvements must be sited. Outside of the Limits of Disturbance only approved above-ground thinning of existing vegetation or spot planting, and the reasonable and necessary placement of utility service lines to the Lot may occur.


    DWELLING COVERAGE: Within each lot, the Preliminary and Final Plat must designate the maximum size of allowable structures in plan view, including eves, overhangs, and outbuildings, which may be constructed on the Lot. This is not the Floor Area, but the area of Lot coverage.


    OTHER IMPERVIOUS COVERAGE: Within each lot, the Preliminary and Final Plat must designate the maximum area of impervious surface allowed on a lot in addition to the Dwelling Coverage, including driveways, concrete slabs, walkways, steps and other surfaces impervious to water (page 35 of the ADD).


    IMPERVIOUS AREA: Page 35 of the ADD


    TOTAL FLOOR AREA: Within each lot, the Preliminary and Final Plat must designate the maximum Floor Area as defined by the Uniform Building Code, which does not include garages.


    GARAGE AREA: Each Lot must contain a garage. The maximum allowable garage shall be 600 square feet per dwelling. Larger garage areas will be counted against the total Allowable Floor Area of the Dwelling.


    IRRIGATED LANDSCAPE AREA: The Preliminary and Final Plats for each Single Family Subdivision must show the maximum allowable irrigated area for each Lot. The irrigated area is that portion of the Lot which may be irrigated and/or planted in non-native plants using additional water. The actual irrigated area will be shown on the Final Plat, but will average 1,600 square feet on each Lot. Some drip irrigation of native drought resistant plants may be done beyond this limitation.


    UPPER STORY RESTRICTION: Succeeding or higher stories of a dwelling must be no larger than 75% of the next lower story if that lower story, as mentioned by the intersection of the floorplate plane with natural grade, is 50% or more above natural grade. In split-level designs such ratio is by reference to floor directly below as opposed to the half-story.


    BASEMENT (1997 UBC): Is any floor level below the first story building, except that a floor level in a building having only one floor level shall be classified as a basement unless such floor level qualifies as a first story as defined herein.


    STORY: Is that portion of a building included between the upper surface of any floor and the upper surface of the floor next above, except the topmost story shall be that portion of a building included between the upper surface of the topmost story and the ceiling or roof above. If the finished floor level directly above the usable or unused under-floor space is more than 6 feet (1829 mm) above grade, as defined herein, for more than 50 percent of the total perimeter or is more that 12 feet (3658 mm) above grade, as defined herein, at any point, such as unusable under-floor space shall be considered as a story.


    STORY, FIRST: Is the lowest story in a building that qualifies as a story, as defined herein, except that a floor level in a building having only one floor level shall be classified as a first story, provided such floor level is not more than 4 feet (1219 mm) below grade, as defined herein, for more than 50 percent of the total perimeter, or not more than 8 feet (2438 mm) below grade, as defined herein, at any point.


    APPENDIX I

    THE WASATCH COUNTY OR PARK CITY MUNICIPAL PROCESS

    BUILDING PERMIT & CERTIFICATE OF OCCUPANCY

    STEP 1: CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENT SUBMITTAL TO WASATCH COUNTY (DEERCREST ESTATES LOTS) OR PARK CITY (SNOW TOP LOTS)

    When the DRC has issued a Letter of Approval the building documents package may be submitted to the Wasatch County (or Park City) Building Department to begin the building permit process.


    STEP 2: BUILDING PERMIT REVIEW PROCESS

    Construction plans will be processed through the following departments prior to issuance of building permits:

    STEP 3: INITIAL CONSTRUCTION:

    Initial construction shall proceed as follows:

    Step 4: BUILDING CONSTRUCTION:

    Building proceeds with required inspections from the Park City or Wasatch County Building Department.

    Step 5: CERTIFICATE OF OCCUPANCY:

    Certificate of Occupancy issued by Wasatch County or Park City subject to the following:

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    APPENDIX J

    SALES SIGNAGE GUIDELINES

    Lot or "For Sale" signs consist of signs for identifying Lots or Homes for sale. They are 40" wide x 48" tall. The template for this sign has a dark green background with the Deer Crest logo and the address location. Below this can be all other pertinent information, such as Architect, Builder, Realtor, Owner and any other contact information. These signs may be purchased through Park City Signs by contacting Susan Packard at (435) 649-1235 x102. For sign placement and required frames contact either Park City Signs (435) 649-1235 or Josh at Ironhorse signs (435) 640-7485.

    APPENDIX K

    CONSTRUCTION SIGNAGE GUIDELINES

    Signage

    A coordinated and united signage system is proposed for Deer Crest to provide both graphic and visual continuity. Signage design standards will be coordinated and established by the DRC based on these Design Guidelines.


    A well-coordinated system of directional and informational signage is necessary within large-scale projects such as Deer Crest to clarify and provide information to visitors and residents and to reinforce the community's continuity and harmony. Signs perform three primary functions:

    1. They identify place and accessibility
    2. They indicate danger and provide warning or cautionary data
    3. They provide information concerning location, routing and traffic flow

    Information on signs should be clear and concise, and signs should be located in obvious areas to assure visibility. Lettering styles should be uniform and bold yet simple. Color schemes with contrasting colors, especially light colors on dark backgrounds, are the most readable and noticeable from longer distances. The sign system should also include a graphic or logo to reinforce the Deer Crest identity and image.


    Whenever possible, signs should be organized into unified systems, combined with lighting fixtures and kiosks or located in highly visible, well-lighted areas. Informational signs should be located in areas where people gather, change direction or change mode of travel. They should be placed where they can be incorporated with the design of other site elements and where they allow safe pedestrian clearance and are not in conflict with door openings or vehicular and equipment operation. Where critical routing is necessary, directional information and arrows should be provided to aid people in traveling quickly and easily to their destinations. Signs that give direction to handicapped access points and facilities should be utilized. The success of a comprehensive signage program for Deer Crest is dependent upon a uniform and consistent application of established design standards with all types of signs, whether incidental or informational.


    It is important to ensure that the requirements for signage are met with efficient, functional signs that are aesthetically pleasing and durable. Sign failure can result from poor workmanship, improper materials, inadequate maintenance, and/or misunderstanding as to the environmental conditions anticipated and performance standards expected. To ensure that signage systems meet expectations, the following standards should be considered:

    1. Sign materials should be such that they can withstand weather conditions and be generally damage proof
    2. Signing systems should require minimum painting and be rust and pit proof
    3. Color should be fade resistant
    4. Signs should be equipped with break-away supports for safety and ease of repair and maintenance
    5. Signs should be fireproof or fire retardant
    6. Signs included in the system to meet state and federal requirements should be reflective but free from annoying glare
    7. Support and anchoring devices for signage systems should accommodate and/or exceed building code standards and state requirements
    8. If signage material is aluminum, all materials and applications should be in accordance with established procedures and standards

    Information on signs should be clear and concise, and signs should be located in obvious areas to assure visibility. Lettering styles should be uniform and bold yet simple. Color schemes with contrasting colors, especially light colors on dark backgrounds, are the most readable and noticeable from longer distances. The sign system should also include a graphic or logo to reinforce the Deer Crest identity and image.


    Whenever possible, signs should be organized into unified systems, combined with lighting fixtures and kiosks or located in highly visible, well-lighted areas. Informational signs should be located in areas where people gather, change direction or change mode of travel. They should be placed where they can be incorporated with the design of other site elements and where they allow safe pedestrian clearance and are not in conflict with door openings or vehicular and equipment operation. Where critical routing is necessary, directional information and arrows should be provided to aid people in traveling quickly and easily to their destinations.

    APPENDIX L

    Wasatch County Code requirement change for LOD fencing

    To: Mark Allen, Deer Crest Construction Coordinator

    From: Doug Smith, Wasatch County Planning Director

    Date: September 17, 2012


    I have reviewed your proposal below and read Section 16.21.35 of the Wasatch County Land Use code regarding the Limits of Disturbance (LOD). I have also reviewed Section 16.28.07 of the code which states the intent of the LOD. I believe that the intent of the LOD is different than the LOD fence and items enumerated in 16.28.07 state the purposes for preserving the vegetation outside of the LOD. The type of fencing, to me, is somewhat irrelevant as long as it is visible and everyone can clearly see where the LOD ends. Therefore I see no reason why the LOD fence cannot be a "T" stake system with a bright colored rope to identify the boundaries of the LOD area. I would add one additional criteria and that is that bright colored ribbon is tied on the rope if it is not visible through heavy vegetation so that it is visible to excavators and adjacent property owners. This modification is allowed by the code in Section 16.21.35 which states, "The requirements of this provision may be waived or modified by written authorization of the County Planning Director."


    This modification is only approved by the Planning Department. If there are other code sections that require fencing that the Planning Department does not have control over these sections would be required to be enforced unless waived by their administrators.


    Appendix M

    Plat Maps 1–92

    Appendix N

    Plat Maps 93–125 & 146

    Appendix O

    Plat Maps 126–130

    Appendix P

    Plat Maps 131–145

    Appendix Q

    Plat Maps Hidden Hollow Lots

    Appendix R

    Plat Maps “U” Lots 1–8
    Plat Map Lots 1 & 2 Amended
    Plat Maps “U” Lots 9–12


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